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Frequently Asked Questions
QUESTIONS
Air Force
  1. Who was the first enlisted aviation fatality and what is named after him?
  2. What is the fastest US Air Force nuclear capable bomber to have seen active service?
  3. Which Branch gave birth to the US Air Force?
  4. What is a combat controller in the Air Force?
  5. Who was the first female general officer of the Air Force?
  6. What is the Air Force Cross?
  7. In the Vietnam Era how many Air Force men received the Air Force Cross?
  8. Since 1975 how many Air Force men received the Air Force Cross?
  9. What is the order of the sword in the Air Force?
  10. Who was the first Amrican pilot shot down in war and when?
  11. What Air Force command is responsible for providing strategic airlift and air transportation for all military forces overseas?
  12. Air Force History and Traditions Museum is located where?
  13. America's top ace, Maj. Richard Bong, scored most of his 40 victories while flying what aircraft?
  14. What is the name of the B-17F (serial number 41-24485) assigned to the 324th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 91st Bombardment Group, in England in 1942?
  15. At 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945, the Tinian-based B-29 released its single atomic bomb over Hiroshima. What was the planes name?
  16. On 22 July 1948, what were the three B-29s of the 43rd Bombardment Group that departed Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, on a round-the-world flight attempt called?
  17. The Martin bomber was withdrawn from service when?
  18. What aircraft did the Douglas A-26 replace?
  19. The Douglas A-26 was redesigned what?
  20. During world War II what did the letter "P" designator stand for when identifying an aircraft?
  21. During World War II what did the letter "L" designator stand for when identifying an aircraft?
  22. What is the nickname given to the clouds and lightning bolts on the bills of Senior Air Force Officer hats?
Aircraft
  1. What version of the F-4 Phantom was the variant used in Wild Weasel missions?
Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the F-14?
Aircraft
  1. What set apart Japanese pilot Nobu Fujita from the rest of the Japanese pilots?
Aircraft
  1. What World War I British multi-role Avro bi-plane was made in greater numbers than any other aircraft prior to World War II?
Aircraft
  1. In what theater of the war was the first flyable Japanese Zero recovered?
Aircraft
  1. How many US helicopters were lost in Vietnam?
Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the F-22?
Aircraft
  1. What World War I American flying unit had more air victories than any other American unit?
Aircraft
  1. The Huey was what kind of helicopter?
Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the EA-6B?
Aircraft
  1. What was significant about the Austro-Hungarian Aviatik B-1 aircraft, shot down 5 Oct 1914?
Aircraft
  1. Why did the pilot of the first recovered flyable zero believe his engine had lost oil pressure?
Aircraft
  1. What country produced the most aircraft in World War I?
Aircraft
  1. The B-52 bombers flew what kind of missions?
Aircraft
  1. What became of the first flyable Zero recovered?
Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the F-15?
  2. What is the name for the Mi-24?
Aircraft
  1. The F4 Phantom Fighter plane flew what kind of missions?
Aircraft
  1. What country lost the most aircraft in World War I?
Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the Mi-28?
Aircraft
  1. What was the name of the ace in World War I with the most victories?
Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the MiG-29?
Aircraft
  1. Where did the Sopwith 'Camel' get it's name?
Aircraft
  1. What is the Chinese version of the MiG-21 Fishbed that the North Korean Air Force uses?
  2. What was the name of the first American pilot to shoot down 5 aircraft in World War I?
  3. What Aircraft can deliver a BLU-82 'Daisy Cutter'?
Battles
  1. What regiment did Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain command in the Battle of Gettysburg when he saved the Union left by ordering a bayonet charge?
  2. What was the largest Civil War battle in Florida?
  3. What was the opening engagement of the Civil War?
  4. What battle earned General Grant the nickname of "Unconditional Surrender Grant"?
  5. What are the alternative names of various battles?
Desert Storm
  1. What US weapon started the Air war in Desert Storm?
  2. What triggered the US to move into Operation Desert Shield?
  3. What was the UN Resolution 678?
  4. How long did the ground war of Desert Storm last?
  5. What was the date of the cease fire in Desert Storm?
  6. What was the date the Marines were delpoyed to Saudi Arabia after Iraq invaded Kuwait?
  7. How many sorties flew per day in Desert Storm?
  8. The United States entered The Gulf War after a call for protection by what country?
  9. The United States set a deadline, for all Iraq forces to be out of Kuwait. What was the date?
  10. Several weeks before Baghdad was bombed on January 17th, 1991, U.S. intelligence agents successfully inserted a computer virus into Iraq\'s military computers. It was designed to do what?
  11. What weapon being used to clear a large minefield caused an SAS observation post to break radio silence,thinking we had gone nuclear?
Army
  1. The US Army's 1st Ranger Bn. is located at what Georgia air base?
  2. Who was the US Army physican who headed the "Yellow Fever" research project in the 1890s?
  3. What famous Civil War General was last in his class at West Point?
  4. Though a poor student at west point,George Armstrong Custer got an A and won high praise for a creative writing assignment. What was the paper about?
  5. What does CARS stand for?
  6. What unit has been authorized by the Secretay of War and wears the cloth insiginia with two red stripes and one green stripe in the middle?
  7. What unit has been authorized by the Secretary of War and wears a belt buckle with a five toed Chinese dragon on it encircled by a disc bearing the number 9 and under the number 9 is the motto "Keep Up the Fire"?
  8. Who was the first woman in the Army Nurse Corp to recieve the Bronze Star?
  9. Who was the first woman to receive the Army Distinquished Service Medal?
  10. Is the Army the 1st., 2nd., 3rd., 4th., or 5th. established force of the military forces?
  11. What Civil War Union General was a hero in the Mexican War?
  12. Who was the first General and Commander in Chief of the Army?
  13. When was the Special Forces Unit formed and where?
  14. When did Aviation become a seperate branch in the Army?
  15. The 4.2 mortar battalion provided what kind of support to the Army in World War II?
  16. Why did the artillery arm of the US Army fight exclusively with French or British weapons in Europe in World War I?
  17. Who was the first commander of the Army Ground Forces in World War II?
  18. What is the 101st. Airborne also known as ?
  19. What is The 82nd. Airborne also know as?
  20. What is the 11th Airborne Division also known as?
  21. What Infantry Division in the Army does "Rainbow" refer to ?
  22. What Infantry Division in the Army does "Red Bull" refer to?
  23. What Infantry Division in the Army does "Dixie" refer to?
  24. What is the USAHMI?
  25. What is the AHF?
  26. Why was MG William F. Dean nicknamed "Walking General" by local Japanese in the Korean War?
  27. Fort Lewis, Washington was named for what American explorer and Army officer?
  28. What is The 173rd. Airborne also know as?
  29. How many medals did Audie Murphy actually recieve during his military career?
Battles
  1. Name the 5 (five) D- Day Beaches
Battles
  1. The 1st Newfoundland Regiment was obliterated, losing well over 700 of its 801 members, as it charged into interlocking enemy machine guns. During which battle did this slaughter occur?
Battles
  1. What war, named for a part of the human anatomy, was fought in the eastern US from 1739-1748?
Battles
  1. The first US Infantry ground combat unit committed to Vietnam, came ashore at what place, 8 March 1965?
Battles
  1. What huge Jan.1915 naval battle took place between the German and British fleet units?
Battles
  1. What naval battle gave control of the seas to the British in World War I?
Battles
  1. Which US Army Officer was Court Martialled for the My Lai massacre?
Battles
  1. Who commanded the US 82nd Airborne Div for Operation "Market-Garden"?
Battles
  1. The greatest grenade battle of World War I occurred when?
Battles
  1. What town was the British 1st Airborne Div. tasked to capture during Operation "Market-Garden"?
Battles
  1. When was the USS Maddox attacked in the Gulf of Tonkin incident?
Battles
  1. What battle front's main impact on the war was to draw carriers away from the Pacific Theater,tipping the scales more in our favor for The Battle of Midway ?
Battles
  1. When did the Tet offensive Begin?
Battles
  1. The Operations code name for the allied landings on D-Day was?
Battles
  1. What was the largest Marine ground offensive in Vietnam?
  2. What kind of combat were the Marines engaged in the 30 day battle of Hue City?
Battles
  1. What was the intended target to be bombed 3 days after the bombing of Hiroshima?
  2. The 2nd Polish fighting Corps fighting the Battle of Monte Cassino used what animal to move boxes of ammunition?
Battles
  1. What was the Battle of Long Tan?
Battles
  1. During the battles of Stalingrad and Kursk the Soviet Red Army used what animal to blow up tanks?
  2. Why did they call it D-Day? Why didn't they call it A, B or C Day?
Battles
  1. what was the group Rolling thunder about?
Operation Enduring Freedom
  1. When did Operation Enduring Freedom begin?
  2. What city was the first to be Liberated from the Taliban?
  3. Afghanistan's capital, Kabul was liberated on what date?
  4. Who replaced the Marines of Task Force 58 on January 29, 2002 and where called "Task Force Rakkasan"?
  5. During the Air War of Enduring Freedom how many sorties flew per day?
  6. What was operation Noble Eagle?
Boot Camp - Basic Training
  1. What are the proper titles of those entrusted to train new recruits in each service branch?
  2. What's the basic pay of a recruit?
  3. How many recruits entering the military today have a high school diploma?
  4. Where is Marine boot camp?
  5. Where is Army boot camp?
  6. Where is Air Force boot camp?
  7. Where is Navy boot camp?
  8. Where is Coast Guard boot camp?
  9. Where do those who train recruits come from?
  10. Why is there recruit training?
  11. How long is Navy boot camp and where is it at?
Civil War
  1. Who was the first officer of the Army of the Potomach to capture enemy colors?
  2. Who was the first Aeronaut in the Civil war,flying the first observation ballon ?
  3. What was the military issue of enlisted underwear made from?
  4. What is a haversack?
  5. What type of sleeping protection was issued to infantrymen?
  6. How many trunks of personal belongings where junior officers allowed?
  7. How where trunks of officers personal belongings transported?
  8. What was the weight of gear that a soldier carried?
  9. Why were the Rebels sometimes called Butternuts?
  10. What did the soldiers use to make a corn shredder?
  11. What illnes did the organizer of the Iron Brigade, Rufus King suffer from?
  12. Who was the Confederate Brig. Gen. nicknamed
  13. Who was the Confederate chief of artillery that was said to utter this prayer after firing his cannons at the enemy:
  14. Who was the only Confederate officer to jump four ranks from Captain to Brig. Gen.?
Vehicles
  1. The most common US tank used in Vietnam was?
Vehicles
  1. What are the specs. of the M-46 Patton Tank used in the Korean War?
Vehicles
  1. What was an observation balloon called in World War I?
Vehicles
  1. What was the name of the World War II German heavy tank destroyer, Jadpanzer IV?
  2. In WWII which branch of the US Armed Forces had the most Ships?
Vehicles
  1. What vehicle served valuable transport, reconnaissance and fire support functions in a variety of terrain in Vietnam?
Vehicles
  1. What were the specs of the M-26 Pershing Tank used in the Korean War?
Vehicles
  1. What was a PBR in Vietnam?
Vehicles
  1. What were the specs of the M-24 Chaffee Tank used in the Korean War?
Coast Guard
  1. When did the Coast Guard adopt the “slash” for its cutters, boats, and aircraft?
  2. In what wars and conflicts did the Coast Guard serve?
  3. The US Coast guard was Commisioned on August 4,1790 as a "system of Revenue Cutters" What year did it recieve it's current name?
  4. One Coast Guardsman has recieved the Medal Of Honor getting hundreds of Marines off a beachead in a cross fire. what is his name?
  5. What is the difference between the legal authority of Petty Officers and Comissioned Officers in the US Coast Guard as compaired to those in the US Navy?
  6. What is the largest ship the Coast Guard has to date?
  7. What five formerly seperate overlapping federal agencies now comprise the US Coast Guard?
  8. What was the name of the USCG Surveillance Task Force in Vietnam?
  9. What color were the USCG boats and ships painted in Vietnam to keep them hidden at night?
  10. What is special about the 47 foot Motor lifeboat in the USCG?
  11. What does the abbreviation DMB stand for in the USCG?
  12. What does ATON stand for in the USCG?
  13. Who has the nickname "Father of the Coast Guard"?
  14. How many Hamilton Class High Endurance Cutters do the U.S. Coast Guard have?
  15. On the HH60 \"J\" Model USCG helicopter it carries a LLRU-20 life raft. How many persons can it hold?
  16. The rescue basket on a CG helicopter can hold how many pounds?
  17. The orange and blue stripe on the USCG Cutters are painted at what degree of angle?
  18. Who was the most celebrated lifesaver in the world?
  19. Who earned the Treasury's Department Gold Lifesaving Medal?
  20. What is the origin of the saying "You have to go out but you don't have to come back"
  21. What were the names of the three men that deserted the Point Judith Station on Sept. 4th 1906?
  22. Who is the parent agency of the USCG?
  23. Where did Douglas Albert Munro, the only Coastguardsman to receive the MOH earn it?
  24. Who led the Lifesaving Service after being re-birthed after the Civil War?
  25. What was the name of the first Cutter to be tasked for rescue searches in 1831 by The Secretary of the Treasury?
  26. What was a mortar apparatus used for in early lifesaving in the Lifesaving Service?
  27. What is AMVER?
  28. What are the consequences for alerting the Coast Guard to a false distress call?
  29. What is the operation cost of a single Coast Guard plane hourly that is involved in a search and rescue?
  30. What is the operation cost of a USCG cutter hourly that is involved in a search and rescue?
  31. What is the operation cost of a USCG small boat hourly that is involved in a rescue?
  32. What is the Coast Guard's motto?
Life in the Military
  1. What's the nickname given to the kids of servicemembers?
  2. What is the nickname given to the educational assistance program for military veterans?
  3. What is the name of the daily newspaper for American GIs overseas?
  4. Who has the TOUGHEST job in the military?
  5. What is the bedrock of military law for the entire US Armed Forces?
  6. What's the nickname given to the powdered drink mix served in military dining halls?
  7. What recreational and support facilities are found on a typical base?
  8. Who makes the uniforms, unit patches, insignia, metal emblems and other clothing items worn by GIs?
  9. What is a commissary?
  10. Can an enlisted person become a commissioned officer?
  11. Where is the LARGEST US military installation?
  12. Can you earn a college degree while serving in the military?
  13. What is a technical school?
  14. When are servicemembers paid?
  15. What is the ASVAB?
  16. What is a "dining-in"?
  17. What is Space-A travel?
  18. Do children living with their military parent(s) overseas still attend school?
  19. What's referred to by GIs as a "Big Chicken Dinner"?
  20. Where can a military person register their DD2-14's to keep them safe and easily obtain a copy?
  21. Who provides television and radio services for US Forces overseas?
  22. Who provides for the recreational needs of servicemembers and their families?
  23. What is the USO?
Weapons
  1. What antipersonnel weapon was developed as a result of the human wave attacks used by the North Korean army during the Korean War?
Weapons
  1. What was the greatest limitation of the M60 General Purpose Machine Gun in Vietnam?
Weapons
  1. What was unusual in the operation of the World War I "Davis Gun", an aircraft gun invented by US Navy Commander Davis?
Weapons
  1. What World War II US-made single-shot partisan's pistol, actually tool longer to load than to produce (7 1/2 seconds)?
Weapons
  1. The Mark IIIA-1 handgrenade weighed how much during the Korea War?
Weapons
  1. What missile launcher, was standard issue in Vietnam?
Weapons
  1. What did the French call their bayonet?
Weapons
  1. How many rounds did a M3A1 Grease Gun magazine hold used in the Korean War?
Weapons
  1. What was a hand grenade or a bomb called in World War I?
Weapons
  1. What was the most common field support weapon used in Vietnam?
Weapons
  1. What kind of weapon is the M1911A1 used in the Korean War?
Weapons
  1. What machine gun firing linked .223cal M-16 ammo was adopted by the SEALs but rejected by all other branches due to high maintenance requirements?
Weapons
  1. What was referred to officially as 'No. 5' in WW1?
  2. The most famous wartime pistol was?
Weapons
  1. What weapon did the US marines use as a sniper rifle in the Korean War?
Weapons
  1. What kind of gun was the Lewis Gun?
Weapons
  1. What were the Automatic weapons used in the Korean War?
  2. What type of grenades were used in the Korean War?
Weapons
  1. What was a 'stick' grenade?
  2. What was a 'cricket ball' grenade?
  3. Which grenade was liable to explode prematurely if it came into contact with an object while in the act of being thrown?
  4. What were 'jam-tin' bombs?
  5. What weapon,perfected in the US during WWI and produced in quantity was never issued for fear of being copied yet saw much usage in later wars?
Weapons
  1. Why does the World war II Japanese 99 LMG shoot 7.7mm Rounds.Instead of 7mm rounds?
  2. Did Adolf Hitler have plans to use chemical weapons against allied troops?
Korean War
  1. Who relieved American General Douglas MacArthur from his military command?
  2. What communist dictator ruled North Korea in 1950?
  3. What year did the Korean War end?
  4. What did the Korean Forces use to communicated with causing terror?
  5. What was a first in history for woman marine Reservists in the Korean War?
  6. What date did the Korean War start?
  7. How many Korean War participants received the MOH?
  8. What state has the highest number of Korean War Veterans?
  9. What infantry division suffered the most losses?
  10. Who was president at the onset of the Korean War?
  11. Why was the Korean War deemed "Truman's War"?
  12. When was the first engagement of North Korea/US in the Korean War?
  13. Who was the highest ranking POW in the Korean War?
Vehicles
  1. What is a HUMVEE?
  2. What is the designation of the British Alvis-built, tracked, armored, anti-armored personnel carrier vehicle?
  3. What is the production successor to the British "Chieftain" tank?
  4. What is the maximum speed of a Papa?
  5. What's the GI nickname for the 425-gallon water trailer?
Marine Corps
  1. How did the Marine come to have the nickname 'Jarhead'?
  2. When did the Marine Corps start using the Campaign Cover (Smokey Bear)?
  3. What rabid anti-communist senator, known as "Tail-Gunner Joe", served in the US Marines?
  4. "Gunny" is what E-7 US Marine Corps rank?
  5. Which US Marine faced prosecution for the Iran-Contra Scandal?
  6. Why are Marines called 'Leather Necks'?
  7. What island was relatively undefended when Allied Forces first arrived then was bypassed and in the months that followed heavily fortified costing huge loss of life when it was finally invaded?
  8. In 1985 - 1986 women Marines were ordered to do two things what where they?
  9. In 1966 woman Marines received an issue of which part of the DI uniform?
  10. Who was the first woman in the Marine Corp?
  11. During the War of 1812 with England, the British burned down nearly every public building in Washington.(including the White House and the Capital). What Building was spared from the burnings?
  12. Who was the first Negro to be commissioned in the United States Marine Corps?
  13. What is the crucible?
  14. What year was the regulation adopted for the outline of specifications for the sword the non-commissioned officers wear today?
  15. What is the oldest post in the Marine Corps.
  16. What is the same about all Marines?
  17. The red stripe on the blue trousers of the U.S. Marine NCO and Officers commemorates what in the U.S. Mexican War?
  18. The emblem of the Marine Corps eagle, globe and anchor was adopted in what year?
  19. What happened on January 10, 1995?
  20. Where is the largest concentration of Marines OUTSIDE the continental United States?
  21. Who was the first woman Marine to be selected for the Naval Aviation training?
  22. Other than Okinawa, where else does the Marine Corps have bases overseas?
  23. Marines have engaged in combat against the enemy on every continent of the world except two. What are they?
  24. Who was the only Marine to die on Antarctica?
  25. How many MOH's did Marine Smedley Butler earn?
  26. What was the nickname of Marine General Holland M. Smith that led the invasion of the Battle of Iwo Jima.
  27. How many Marines earn the MOH in the Battle of Iwo Jima?
  28. General Vandergrift commanded what division of Marines in the Battle of Guadalcanal?
  29. How many Marines landed on Guadalcanal?
  30. What did the Marine fighter pilots dubb themselves after the air field at Guadalcanal became useable?
  31. Who became the first ace in the "Cactus Air Force"?
  32. Who gets the first two pieces of cake on the Marine Corps Birthday?
  33. What is the most outstanding custom in the Marine Corps?
  34. On the morning of 1 January of each year what happens?
  35. What year did the Marine Corps adopt the rope into the emblem?
  36. What former naval air station is still known officially as Admiral Mark Mitscher Field?
  37. Who was the first Marine?
  38. Where were the Marines born?
  39. Where did the Creed come from and When did it begin?
  40. What are the requirements to be enlisted in sniper school?
  41. Why is the star of David on the NCO sword?
Weapons
  1. How did KA-BAR get it's name?
  2. The orange-coloured magazine on the new AKS and AKD Soviet assault rifles is made of what material?
  3. What does "AUG" mean in designating the new Steyr produced assault rifle of Austria?
  4. What man-pack anti-aircraft missile is carried by US Army and Marine infantry?
  5. The "Tampell" is what Mideast nation's 120mm mortar?
  6. What is the size of the cannon on the AC-130U Spooky?
  7. What is the name for the BGM-109 missile?
  8. What is the Russian version of the B-1B Lancer?
  9. What is the size of the Bushmaster chain gun on the M2A3 Bradley?
  10. What is the name of the GAU-8A 30mm Gatling gun on the A-10?
  11. What is the Russian copy of the C-130?
  12. What is the Russian copy of the B-29?
  13. What is C4?
  14. What does AWACS stand for?
  15. What is the main gun on an Iowa-class BB?
  16. How many 21-inch torpedo tubes are there on a 688I?
  17. How many rockets does a M270 MLRS carry?
  18. How many Trident IIs does an Ohio-class SSBN carry?
  19. What size of ammunition does the Israeli Uzi use?
  20. What is meant by “spray and pray”?
  21. Why were the Yankee Notch SSGNs retired?
  22. What is a Long Tom?
  23. What is the difference between a Machine gun and a Sub-Machine Gun?
  24. What Famous machine gun was used by Clyde Barrow and was also used to kill him?
  25. What kind of ammunition size and bullet type will the XM29 use when it is complete?
Middle East Excursion
  1. Why does the military use POGs instead of coins in the Middle East?
  2. What are the military personnel collecting and trading in the Middle East?
  3. Saddam has been sole ruler since what year?
  4. What is an EGBU-28
  5. Operation Mountain Blizzard took place in what country?
National Guard
  1. When did the National Guard become a reserve component of the US Army?
  2. Are National Guard Units under State or Federal control?
  3. How much fuel does one fuel cell carry on a Boeing KC-135 ?
  4. How many automobile tires would you be able to make from the landing gear tires of a KC-135 jet-tanker transport plane? 8 main gear wheels and 2 nose wheels
  5. During aerial refueling at 600 miles per hour, the boom operator is how many feet above the nose of a Boeing B-52 bomber?
  6. What Act proclaimed that all states rename their militia the National Guard?
  7. How many National Guardsmen were mobilized for Korea?
  8. How many National Guardsmen were called to serve in Desert Storm?
  9. What role are the National Guard playing during the current war?
  10. What is the National Guards dual mission?
  11. The Air National Guard was established as a separate component of the Air Force in what year?
  12. When were women authorized to be enlisted or appointed other than nurses to the Air National Guard?
  13. Who was the first woman to join the Air National Guard ?
  14. When did the first woman join the Air National Guard?
  15. What is the motto of the 129th Rescue Wing?
  16. Where is technical training provided for the Air National Guard?
  17. The 144th Fighter Wing's mission is to provide what?
  18. The defense officers that will man the base at Camp Denali were trained and will graduate from were?
  19. In 1941, the Iowa National Guard Pilots of the 124th patrolled the Gulf of Mexico, searching for what?
  20. What is the National Guard?
Navy
  1. What do US Navy sailors affectionately call their round white caps?
  2. What was the worlds first nuclear powered aircraft carrier?
  3. Who developed the computer programming language called ADA and discovered the first computer bug?
  4. What food item (with NO SUBSTITUTIONS) has been supplied to the US Navy since its inception?
  5. When and where was the first US aircraft carrier launch?
  6. What does the Navy use for radar coverage like the Air Force uses the E-3B Sentry?
  7. What are the general occupational designations for E1 to E3 paygrades in the Navy?
  8. What two Navy enlisted ratings have remained in continuous use since 1797?
  9. What are the two NEWEST Navy enlisted ratings established in the 21st Century?
  10. What rating is responsible for the maintenance of all ENLISTED service records?
  11. Who gets "promoted" and "advanced" in the Navy?
  12. What submarine sent the historic radio message, "Underway on nuclear power"?
  13. When was the grade of Chief Petty Officer (CPO) established?
  14. What is a brig?
  15. What rating is responsible for the maintenance of all OFFICER service records?
  16. Until 1997, where else did the Navy train its recruits besides Naval Training Center Great Lakes, IL?
  17. What US Presidents served in the Navy?
  18. What was first US battleship?
  19. What is the most famous, best known, most historically significant battleship?
  20. What are the general enlisted occupational communities in the Navy?
  21. What warships were part of the first nuclear-powered naval task group?
  22. What is NCIS?
  23. Who was the "Father of the Nuclear Navy"?
  24. What's an "airdale"?
  25. What was the largest American naval installation outside of the US?
  26. What is a 'Brown Shoe'?
  27. When was the Department of the Navy Formed and what Department ran naval affairs prior to then?
  28. When was the US Navy formed?
  29. What are "rating badges"?
  30. What color is "navy blue"?
  31. Who was the youngest naval officer ever promoted to Rear Admiral (RADM)?
  32. Why do sailors refer to the toilet aboard ship as the "head"?
  33. Who has RATE and RANK in the Navy?
  34. What's a "sea daddy"?
  35. How many five-star Fleet Admirals (FADM) were there?
  36. What's the official name of the "Blue Angels"?
  37. What was the name of the 1st. Ironclad ship?
  38. What does NMCB mean?
  39. How many tons of heavy explosives were dropped by the naval ships and pilots in the days before the Marines landed on D-Day in the Marshall Islands?
  40. How many days did the Navy ships and Naval Pilots bomb before the Marines landed on D-Day in the Marshall Islands?
  41. What MOS did the Navy give to a woman before any other military force?
  42. The department of the Navy is the official time keeper of the the country. Where is the master clock housed?
  43. What does GMT stand for?
  44. What does UTC stand for?
  45. What naval command is responsible for providing strategic sealift and ocean transportation for all military forces overseas?
  46. What Navy aircraft squadron was assigned to support OPERATION DEEP FREEZE for over 30 years?
  47. What was the codename of the Navy\'s Antarctic research project from 1954 to 1968, and assistance to the US Antarctic Program (USAP) of the National Science Foundation until 1994?
  48. Where is the campus of the US Naval Academy?
  49. Admiral Fletcher commanded what carrier groups in the Battle of Guadalcanal?
  50. What ship were the Sullivan brothers (5 brothers) assigned to and all 5 perished aboard?
  51. Who was the only Naval MOH recipient of the Guadalcanal Campaign?
  52. What famous naval station has mooring areas called "Battleship Row" and "Tin Can Row"?
  53. What former US naval facility's motto was "Birthplace of the Winds?"
  54. What US naval facility's motto is "The Footprint of Freedom"?
  55. Where do all officer and enlisted SEAL candidates attend Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training?
  56. What naval air station was granted official recognition as the "Birthplace of Naval Aviation" by a House Armed Services Committee resolution?
  57. What are "black shoes?"
  58. Where does "Anchors Aweigh" derive from?
Vietnam
  1. What was the name of the most successful unofficial American Soldiers Newspaper in the Vietnam War?
  2. What was the most highly successful secret program at eliminating the Viet Cong organizational \'Infra Structure?
  3. Which Gunship support Units accrued the highest amount of per capita medals and citations?
  4. What is the basis for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall?
  5. How many men killed in Vietnam were 16?
  6. How old was the oldest man killed in Vietnam?
  7. What was Ho Chi Minhs birth name?
  8. How many Medals of honor were awarded for valor to date for the Vietnam War?
  9. There were three catagories of Red Cross Workers in Vietnam, one of them were the Supplement Recreational Activities Overseas (SRAO). What was the nickname given to this group of women?
  10. Master Sgt. Debra J Dulinsky of the US Marine Corps was known for what in the Vietnam War?
  11. What was the name of the operation to evacuate the American Embassy in Saigon on april 29, 1975?
  12. What was the name of the operation to evacuate the American Embassy in Phnom Penh, in Cambodia on April 12, 1975?
  13. What was OPERATION MARKET TIME?
  14. What was OPERATION GAME WARDEN?
  15. Besides the US, what other allied nations were involved in the conflict?
  16. What foreign military unit was awarded the US Presidential Unit Citation (PUC)?
  17. In 1968 who convinced President Johnson to deny General William Westmoreland's request for 206,000 more troops in Vietnam?
  18. During the Vietnam War,which Airborne Unit did a group Combat Jump,qualifying all participants for a set of the coveted Combat Jump Wings?
World War I
  1. What stretcher bearer, known to the Diggers of Gallipoli as, "The Bloke with the Donk", repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire to haul wounded ANZAC soldiers to safety using a captured donkey?
  2. Who were the original Stosstruppen or 'Storm Troopers' of the World War I?
  3. On Sept. 28, 1918, during the Battle of Marcoing, Hitler's life was spared when a British Private, later awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous gallantry, took pity on the wounded Lance Corporal, & chose not to shoot him. Who was that soldier?
  4. The "VECHEKA" (or "CHEKA"), the secret assassination/espionage bureau of what nation, was created 19 Dec 1917?
  5. What German general described the 8th Aug 1918 Canadian/Australian/British offensive as "the Black Day of the German Army"?
  6. What infamous German Corperal received the Iron Cross 2nd and 1st Class before being hospitalized for mustard gas exposure?
  7. What was an early name for American Soldiers in World War I?
  8. What's the nickname for Australian soldiers?
  9. What were grenadiers in WWI?
  10. A British bombing team (grenadiers) usually consisted of what in WWI?
  11. Where does the name doughboys come from?
World War II
  1. What World War II US Navy admiral said: "Hit hard, hit first, hit often."?
  2. Who was the US General killed by his own Bombers in Normandy in July 1944?
  3. Who was General Eisenhower's Chief of Staff for the 1944 Normandy Invasion?
  4. Of what material was the Luftwaffe aviator's jacket made?
  5. A white eagle descending on a blood-red outline of Corregidor island, became the insignia of what heroic World War II US Army airborne regiment?
  6. From what island in the Marianas were US aircraft launched to carry out the A-bomb attacks on Japan?
  7. What field marshal surrendered the German forces at Stalingrad?
  8. What popular American movie star's name was given to the inflatable life vest used in World War II?
  9. What Cruiser met a similar fate as the Indianapolis ?
  10. Which Armed Forces Branch sustained the highest per capita casualty rate in WWII?
  11. What specific injury was the cause of General George Patton's death just after WWII?
  12. What were "Mulberries" in World War II?
  13. What did the War Department General Orders Number 24, 4 March 1947 provide?
  14. The Woman Marines Continuous Active Service began when in World War II?
  15. Who was the first enlisted Marine to recieve the MOH in World War II?
  16. What is the name of the person that introduced the idea of using the Navajo Code talkers in World War II?
  17. Who commanded the northern Task Force in Operation "Flintlock" in World War II?
  18. Who commanded the southern Task Force in Operation "Flintlock" in World War II?
  19. What was Admiral Richard L. Connolly's nickname?
  20. Who was the first officer in the US Marine Corps to recieve the MOH in World War II?
  21. What changed the tide of the war with the Japanese?
  22. What was Stalin's original name?
  23. What Japanese battleship was a suicide battleship on it's way to attack?
  24. When did the Nazi salute become standard and why was it this date?
  25. What was the name of the bomber that bombed Nagasaki?
  26. What was the Atlantic Wall?
  27. During World War II, why were the Germans called kraut?
  28. During WW2, why did the USMC switch to the P-44 utilities instead of keeping the perfectly good P-41s? And what is that rediculous horizontal pocket across the butt for?
General Military
  1. What is the "Senior Service" of the US armed forces?
  2. What was Executive Order 9066?
  3. Who was NATO's first Supreme Allied Commander, Europe?
  4. The "Mannerheim Cross" was, until a few years ago, the highest award for valour of what Scandinavian country?
  5. What NATO nation is the only country in the world whose air force is larger than its army?
  6. Where is Britain's main officer academy located?
  7. The 1st Canadian Parachute Bn. of World War II is the forerunner of what present Canadian regiment?
  8. With what US military corps does the British Royal Welch Fusiliers (23rd of Foot) maintain musical affiliations?
  9. "Pro Patria" ("For Country") is the motto of what Canadian infantry regiment?
  10. What Mongol war leader amused himself by building pyramids of human heads?
  11. Later in the year of what war, on 21 October 1967, was the Israeli destroyer "Eilat" sunk by Egyptian missile boats?
  12. What is the color of the ribbon for the "Hero of the Soviet Union" medal?
  13. What action, taken by the 1st Parachute Regt. (1 REP) of the French Foreign Legion, 22 Apr 1960, caused it to be disbanded in disgrace?
  14. Who did Queen Elizabeth I appoint to replace the Earl of Essex in his attempt to subdue the Irish?
  15. Despite earlier experiences and after elaborate preparation, US forces assaulted what Aleutian island only to discover that the Japanese had pulled out weeks before?
  16. In 1834-1841, US Army, Navy and Marine units fought a bitter war with what Floridian Indian tribes?
  17. What was the fabulous broadsword carried by legendary King Arthur?
  18. Which British regiments practice the custom of the "eating of the leek"?
  19. What high ranking North Vietnamese was a graduate of the Soviet General Staff Academy?
  20. In July 1937, Japanese and Chinese troops clashed at the Marco Polo Bridge, outside what Chinese city?
  21. What Japanese city suffered the worst firebombing in history, 10 May 1945?
  22. What inept Mexican general of the US-Mexican War lost a leg while fighting the French in 1838?
  23. What did the Rhodesian Army troops call the communist FRELIMO insurgents of Mozambique?
  24. What 1944 French battle was the last time that defense of a medieval fortress played a decisive role against a mechanized army?
  25. which branch of the US Armed Forces is the longest continuous serving branch?
  26. On March 21,1791 the first Military Seagoing Officers were commissioned by President George Washington. What Branch of Service were they assigned to?
  27. Who was the first woman to receive two medals and what were they?
  28. Who was the first woman to receive the MOH?
  29. Who was the first woman to receive a Purple Heart?
  30. Who cleans up property formerly owned, leased, possessed or operated by the DOD. Such as formerly used defense sites?
  31. What is the largest US regional command?
  32. What was the name of the first station on Antarctica established by the US Navy in 1957?
  33. What US military service has never directly posted any of its personnel on Antarctica?
  34. What was the Air Field at Guadalcanal named?
  35. How many Military Fighting Forces are there?
  36. The term "made his bird" means what?
  37. What was chewed by the Vietnamese that turned their teeth black?
  38. What does E-Tool mean?
  39. What is a green-eye?
  40. What is a Mike-Mike?
  41. What's an MPC?
  42. What's a P-38?
  43. Former soldiers and airmen who have received the Medal of Honor are entitled to an annual pension of how much upon reaching the age of 65?
  44. Five men have received two Medals of Honor. In 1918 the regulations were changed to prevent what?
  45. What's a PF?
  46. What military agency oversees the procurement and distribution of nearly everything that warfighters need?
  47. Where is the prison for US military personnel sentenced by courts-martial to confinement for one year or more?
  48. General Douglas MacArther should have been fired LONG before President Harry truman did the job,why?
  49. What three Famous WWII US Army Generals were involved in a shameful act against fellow Veterans in 1932?
  50. Which Armed Forces Branch is the Cradle of Aviation?
  51. What is the motto od US Special Forces ?
  52. What is the motto of the SAS ?
  53. Which NATO country's Spec Ops unit has a higher attrition rate than than the SEAL training phase BUDS at Coronado,Ca.?
  54. What unit was Delta Force a carbon copy of when it was formed?
  55. What are the animal mascots of each of the five Armed Forces of the US?
  56. What is Chickenhawk?
  57. What agency is responsible for issuing pay to servicemembers on the 1st and 15th of each month?
  58. What is DEERS?
  59. Where do Cadences come from?
  60. What is the US military pace for marching or running?
  61. Why do you sing cadence?
  62. Why are some cadence calls Jodies?
  63. Who was GySgt. Hartman?
  64. Why do the stars appear on the right hand corner of the flag on the patches of some US soldiers' uniforms?
ANSWERS
Air Force
  1. Who was the first enlisted aviation fatality and what is named after him?
    Aviation mechanic Corporal Frank Scott. Scott AFB
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  2. What is the fastest US Air Force nuclear capable bomber to have seen active service?
    The amazing B-58 Hustler.
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  3. Which Branch gave birth to the US Air Force?
    The US Army
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  4. What is a combat controller in the Air Force?
    They are special tactics squadrons deployed to hostile areas to establish assualt zones with air traffic control capabilities, emplace enrooting terminal navigation aids, communication command, control and the demolition or removal of obstacles.
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  5. Who was the first female general officer of the Air Force?
    Jeanne Holm
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  6. What is the Air Force Cross?
    It is an accommodation that is awarded when heroism falls just short of warranting the MOH.
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  7. In the Vietnam Era how many Air Force men received the Air Force Cross?
    20
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  8. Since 1975 how many Air Force men received the Air Force Cross?
    1
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  9. What is the order of the sword in the Air Force?
    The highest honor the Air Force Enlisted Corps can bestow upon a leader.
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  10. Who was the first Amrican pilot shot down in war and when?
    Sgt. Ivy Baldwin. June 30, 1898
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  11. What Air Force command is responsible for providing strategic airlift and air transportation for all military forces overseas?
    The Air Mobility Command's (AMC) mission is to provide airlift, air refueling, special air mission, and aeromedical evacuation for US forces by military transport aircraft and a reserve fleet of US civilian cargo jets in time of emergency. AMC also supplies forces to theater commands to support wartime tasks. As the Air Force component of the US Transportation Command (USTRANSCOM), AMC is the single agency for air mobility.
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  12. Air Force History and Traditions Museum is located where?
    Lackland Airforce Base San Antonio, TX
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  13. America's top ace, Maj. Richard Bong, scored most of his 40 victories while flying what aircraft?
    The P-38
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  14. What is the name of the B-17F (serial number 41-24485) assigned to the 324th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy), 91st Bombardment Group, in England in 1942?
    The Memphis Belle
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  15. At 8:15 a.m. on August 6, 1945, the Tinian-based B-29 released its single atomic bomb over Hiroshima. What was the planes name?
    Enola Gay
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  16. On 22 July 1948, what were the three B-29s of the 43rd Bombardment Group that departed Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Arizona, on a round-the-world flight attempt called?
    The Lucky Ladies
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  17. The Martin bomber was withdrawn from service when?
    In June 1948
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  18. What aircraft did the Douglas A-26 replace?
    The Martin B-26 Marauder
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  19. The Douglas A-26 was redesigned what?
    The Douglas B-26
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  20. During world War II what did the letter "P" designator stand for when identifying an aircraft?
    Pursuit aircraft
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  21. During World War II what did the letter "L" designator stand for when identifying an aircraft?
    Liaison aircraft
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  22. What is the nickname given to the clouds and lightning bolts on the bills of Senior Air Force Officer hats?
    Farts and darts.
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Aircraft
  1. What version of the F-4 Phantom was the variant used in Wild Weasel missions?
    F-4G
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Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the F-14?
    Tomcat
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Aircraft
  1. What set apart Japanese pilot Nobu Fujita from the rest of the Japanese pilots?
    He was the only Japanese pilot to bomb the Continental United States.
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Aircraft
  1. What World War I British multi-role Avro bi-plane was made in greater numbers than any other aircraft prior to World War II?
    Avro 504 series
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Aircraft
  1. In what theater of the war was the first flyable Japanese Zero recovered?
    In the Aluetian Islands,the pilot attempted to land the aircraft near a beach due to reading no oil pressure,the landing gear got caught in some trees and flipped the plane,breaking the pilot's neck but causing minor damage to the aircraft which was found a month later.
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Aircraft
  1. How many US helicopters were lost in Vietnam?
    4,865 ($250,000.00 ea.)
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Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the F-22?
    Raptor
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Aircraft
  1. What World War I American flying unit had more air victories than any other American unit?
    94th Aero Sqaudron.
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Aircraft
  1. The Huey was what kind of helicopter?
    A Bell UH-1
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Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the EA-6B?
    Prowler
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Aircraft
  1. What was significant about the Austro-Hungarian Aviatik B-1 aircraft, shot down 5 Oct 1914?
    First aircraft shot down in aerial combat
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Aircraft
  1. Why did the pilot of the first recovered flyable zero believe his engine had lost oil pressure?
    The surviving member of a PBY he had just shot down was so enraged at being staffed in the water after his plane was shot down he fired back with his service .45 and clipped the tiny oil line that went to the oil gage causing it to read zero pressure.
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Aircraft
  1. What country produced the most aircraft in World War I?
    France, 67,987.
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Aircraft
  1. The B-52 bombers flew what kind of missions?
    Tens of thousands of low-altitude, high-density bombing sorties in North and South Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos.
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Aircraft
  1. What became of the first flyable Zero recovered?
    A student pilot in an American fighter taxied into the mostly wooden aircraft and the propeller ground it to shreds,it was a total loss.
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Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the F-15?
    Eagle
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  2. What is the name for the Mi-24?
    Hind
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Aircraft
  1. The F4 Phantom Fighter plane flew what kind of missions?
    Missions to suppress enemy anti-aircraft fire and counter harassment by lethal MiG attack fighters. The Phantom also served as a bomber, delivering conventional or radar-guided payloads to enemy targets that were too well-protected to be hit by lumbering B-52s. F-4s also prepared target areas by dropping loads of radar-reflecting metallic fibers, known as chaff, to scramble enemy radar.
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Aircraft
  1. What country lost the most aircraft in World War I?
    France 52,640.
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Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the Mi-28?
    Havoc
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Aircraft
  1. What was the name of the ace in World War I with the most victories?
    Manfred Freiherr von Richthofen
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Aircraft
  1. What is the name for the MiG-29?
    Fulcrum
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Aircraft
  1. Where did the Sopwith 'Camel' get it's name?
    Instead of leaving the Twin Vicker Machine Guns exposed.they were covered by cowling,possibly for aerodynamics making a 'hump' that garnered the name 'Camel'.
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Aircraft
  1. What is the Chinese version of the MiG-21 Fishbed that the North Korean Air Force uses?
    Jian-7
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  2. What was the name of the first American pilot to shoot down 5 aircraft in World War I?
    Pvt. Fredrick Libby, later a Captain.
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  3. What Aircraft can deliver a BLU-82 'Daisy Cutter'?
    Only the AC-130 'Combat Talon' gunship can.
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Battles
  1. What regiment did Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain command in the Battle of Gettysburg when he saved the Union left by ordering a bayonet charge?
    20th Maine
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  2. What was the largest Civil War battle in Florida?
    The battle of Olutsee
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  3. What was the opening engagement of the Civil War?
    The Bombardment of Fort Sumter
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  4. What battle earned General Grant the nickname of "Unconditional Surrender Grant"?
    The battle of Bloody Hill.
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  5. What are the alternative names of various battles?
    Union- Bull Run, VA Confederate- Manassas 21 July 1861, Union- Wilsons Creek, MO Confederate- Oak Hills 10 Aug 1861, Union- Logan's Cross Roads, KY Confederate- Mill Springs 19 Jan 1862, Union- Pea Ridge, AR Confederate- Elkhorn Tavern 6-8 Mar 1862, Union- Pittsburg Landing, TN Confederate- Shiloh 6-7 Apr 1862, Union- Fair Oaks, VA Confederate- Seven Pines 31 May-1 Jun 1862, Union- Bull Run, VA (2nd) Confederate- Manassas 29-30 Aug 1862, Union- Antietam, MD Confederate- Sharpsburg 17 Sept 1862, Union- Chaplin Hills, KY Confederate- Perryville 8 Oct 1862, Union- Stones River, TN Confederate- Murfreesboro 30 Dec 1862-2 Jan 1863, Union- Elk Creek, Ind. Terr. Confederate- Honey Springs 17 July 1863, Union- Ocean Pond, FL Confederate- Olustee 20 Feb 1864, Union- Sabine Cross Roads, LA Confederate- Mansfield 8 Apr 1864, Union- Opequon Creek, VA Confederate- Winchester 19 Sept 1864
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Desert Storm
  1. What US weapon started the Air war in Desert Storm?
    Tommahawk Missiles
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  2. What triggered the US to move into Operation Desert Shield?
    The invasion of Kuwait by the Iraqi Republican Guards mechanized infantry, armor, and tank units.
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  3. What was the UN Resolution 678?
    It was a stipulation and it stated that if Saddam did not remove his troops from Kuwait by Jan 15, 1991 the US-led coalition would drive them out.
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  4. How long did the ground war of Desert Storm last?
    4 days. Feb. 24, 1991 - Feb. 28, 1991
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  5. What was the date of the cease fire in Desert Storm?
    April 11, 1991
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  6. What was the date the Marines were delpoyed to Saudi Arabia after Iraq invaded Kuwait?
    August 2, 1990.
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  7. How many sorties flew per day in Desert Storm?
    3,700
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  8. The United States entered The Gulf War after a call for protection by what country?
    Saudi Arabia.
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  9. The United States set a deadline, for all Iraq forces to be out of Kuwait. What was the date?
    January 15, 1991
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  10. Several weeks before Baghdad was bombed on January 17th, 1991, U.S. intelligence agents successfully inserted a computer virus into Iraq\'s military computers. It was designed to do what?
    It was designed to disable much of Baghdad\'s air-defense system.
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  11. What weapon being used to clear a large minefield caused an SAS observation post to break radio silence,thinking we had gone nuclear?
    A BLU-82 Fuel/Air Bomb (The Daisy Cutter)which yields .25 kilotons and looks similar to a nuclear explosion when it goes off.
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Army
  1. The US Army's 1st Ranger Bn. is located at what Georgia air base?
    Hunter Army Airfield
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  2. Who was the US Army physican who headed the "Yellow Fever" research project in the 1890s?
    Major Walter Reed
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  3. What famous Civil War General was last in his class at West Point?
    George Armstrong Custer
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  4. Though a poor student at west point,George Armstrong Custer got an A and won high praise for a creative writing assignment. What was the paper about?
    How he sympathized with the American Indians as being noble and civilized but that their fate was already sealed due to their differences and Western Expansion.
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  5. What does CARS stand for?
    The combat arms regimental system, under which the combat units in the US Army are organized under.
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  6. What unit has been authorized by the Secretay of War and wears the cloth insiginia with two red stripes and one green stripe in the middle?
    The 4th. Infantry
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  7. What unit has been authorized by the Secretary of War and wears a belt buckle with a five toed Chinese dragon on it encircled by a disc bearing the number 9 and under the number 9 is the motto "Keep Up the Fire"?
    The 9th. Infantry
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  8. Who was the first woman in the Army Nurse Corp to recieve the Bronze Star?
    1st. Lieutenant Cordelia E. Cook
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  9. Who was the first woman to receive the Army Distinquished Service Medal?
    Colonel Oveta Culp Hobby
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  10. Is the Army the 1st., 2nd., 3rd., 4th., or 5th. established force of the military forces?
    1st.
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  11. What Civil War Union General was a hero in the Mexican War?
    General Windield S. Scott
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  12. Who was the first General and Commander in Chief of the Army?
    General George Washington
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  13. When was the Special Forces Unit formed and where?
    On June 11, 1952 at Fort Bragg, NC.
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  14. When did Aviation become a seperate branch in the Army?
    On April 12, 1983.
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  15. The 4.2 mortar battalion provided what kind of support to the Army in World War II?
    Chemical Warfare - (WP, smoke, and gas)
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  16. Why did the artillery arm of the US Army fight exclusively with French or British weapons in Europe in World War I?
    The need to standardize Allied Arms, lack of shipping space, lack of industrial capacity. The French and British ordinance specialists also thought the American gun designs were not up to European standards.
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  17. Who was the first commander of the Army Ground Forces in World War II?
    Major General J. Lesley McNair later became Lieutenant General - he was accidentally killed by US bombs while observing Operation COBRA on July 25, 1944.
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  18. What is the 101st. Airborne also known as ?
    "The Screaming Eagles".
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  19. What is The 82nd. Airborne also know as?
    "All American"
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  20. What is the 11th Airborne Division also known as?
    "The Angels"
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  21. What Infantry Division in the Army does "Rainbow" refer to ?
    42nd. Infantry Division
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  22. What Infantry Division in the Army does "Red Bull" refer to?
    34th Infantry Division
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  23. What Infantry Division in the Army does "Dixie" refer to?
    31st Infantry Division
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  24. What is the USAHMI?
    The United States Army Military History Institute - USAMHI serves as the primary research facility for the historical study of the U.S. Army in order to foster greater understanding of the Army's role in our nations history and in its future.
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  25. What is the AHF?
    The American History Foundation - The motto of the Foundation -- Preserve the Heritage...Educate the Future -- summarizes its mission. The Foundation seeks to educate future Americans to fully appreciate the sacrifices that generations of American soldiers have made to safeguard the freedoms of this nation.
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  26. Why was MG William F. Dean nicknamed "Walking General" by local Japanese in the Korean War?
    The General walked everywhere he went.
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  27. Fort Lewis, Washington was named for what American explorer and Army officer?
    Captain Merriweather Lewis
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  28. What is The 173rd. Airborne also know as?
    The Herd
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  29. How many medals did Audie Murphy actually recieve during his military career?
    AWARDS: Medal of Honor; Distinguished Service Cross; Silver Star with First Oak Leaf Cluster; Bronze Star Medal with "V" Device and First Oak Leaf Cluster; Purple Heart with Second Oak Leaf Cluster; Legion of Merit; Good Conduct Medal; Distinguished Unit Emblem with First Oak Leaf Cluster; American Campaign Medal; European-Aftrican-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with one silver service star, three bronze service stars and one bronze service arrowhead; World War II Victory Medal; Combat Infantry Badge; Marksman Badge with Rifle Bar; Expert Badge with Bayonet Bar; French Fourragere in Colors of the Croix de Guerre; French Legion of Honor, Grade of Chevalier; French Croix de Guerre with silver star, and the Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 with Palm.
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Battles
  1. Name the 5 (five) D- Day Beaches
    Utah and Omaha (US); Gold, Juno, and Sword (Anglo-Canadian)
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Battles
  1. The 1st Newfoundland Regiment was obliterated, losing well over 700 of its 801 members, as it charged into interlocking enemy machine guns. During which battle did this slaughter occur?
    Beaumont Hamel
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Battles
  1. What war, named for a part of the human anatomy, was fought in the eastern US from 1739-1748?
    War of Jenkin's Ear
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Battles
  1. The first US Infantry ground combat unit committed to Vietnam, came ashore at what place, 8 March 1965?
    Da Nang
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Battles
  1. What huge Jan.1915 naval battle took place between the German and British fleet units?
    Battle of Dogger Bank
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Battles
  1. What naval battle gave control of the seas to the British in World War I?
    Jutland
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Battles
  1. Which US Army Officer was Court Martialled for the My Lai massacre?
    Lieutenant William L. Calley.
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Battles
  1. Who commanded the US 82nd Airborne Div for Operation "Market-Garden"?
    General Maxwell Taylor
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Battles
  1. The greatest grenade battle of World War I occurred when?
    The greatest grenade battle of the war occurred on the Pozieres Heights on the night of 26-27 July 1916.
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Battles
  1. What town was the British 1st Airborne Div. tasked to capture during Operation "Market-Garden"?
    Arnhem
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Battles
  1. When was the USS Maddox attacked in the Gulf of Tonkin incident?
    August 4, 1964
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Battles
  1. What battle front's main impact on the war was to draw carriers away from the Pacific Theater,tipping the scales more in our favor for The Battle of Midway ?
    The Aluetian Campaign caused Japan to make a critical error in use of it's carriers to help protect supply lines and provide air cover.
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Battles
  1. When did the Tet offensive Begin?
    Jan 29, 1968.
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Battles
  1. The Operations code name for the allied landings on D-Day was?
    Although many people refer to the Allied D-Day landings in Normandy as "Operation Overlord", the operation was actually called "Operation Neptune". The landings were originally known as Overlord, but in September 1943 the codename was changed to Neptune, and Overlord from then on was used to refer to the general Allied strategy in northwestern Europe.
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Battles
  1. What was the largest Marine ground offensive in Vietnam?
    Operation Starlite. Aug 15, 1965
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  2. What kind of combat were the Marines engaged in the 30 day battle of Hue City?
    House to house
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Battles
  1. What was the intended target to be bombed 3 days after the bombing of Hiroshima?
    Kokura, it was shrouded in smog and the target was to be clear so the alternative was Nagasaki and it was bombed instead.
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  2. The 2nd Polish fighting Corps fighting the Battle of Monte Cassino used what animal to move boxes of ammunition?
    A brown bear
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Battles
  1. What was the Battle of Long Tan?
    On August 18, 1966, the most intense battle ever to involve Australian soldiers and the Viet Cong, was fought in a rubber plantation at a place called Long Tan in Phuoc Tuy Province. The battle involved D Company, 6th Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (6RAR) and elements of the 5th Viet Cong Division and other branches of the North Vietnamese Army. The Australian contingent was about 108 strong - the enemy numbered around 2,000. This battle was the biggest and longest daylight action the Australians had in Vietnam. Total Australian casualties at Long Tan were 18 killed and 24 wounded in action. The Viet Cong force, estimated at 2,500, had been badly mauled by the Australian Army and New Zealand artillery, as 245 enemy dead were found in the battle area. It was apparent that the Viet Cong commanders had failed to appreciate the effectiveness of sustained artillery fire by the Aussies and Kiwis, and paid dearly as a result.
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Battles
  1. During the battles of Stalingrad and Kursk the Soviet Red Army used what animal to blow up tanks?
    Dogs, they trained them to crawl under the tanks with a bomb strapped to their back and then the bomb was detonated.
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  2. Why did they call it D-Day? Why didn't they call it A, B or C Day?
    The terms D-day and H-hour are used for the day and hour on which a combat attack or operation is to be initiated. They designate the day and hour of the operation when the day and hour have not yet been determined, or where secrecy is essential. There is but one D-day and one H-hour for all units participating in a given operation. When used in combination with figures, and plus or minus signs, these terms indicate the point of time preceding or following a specific action. Thus, H?3 means 3 hours before H-hour, and D+3 means 3 days after D-day. H+75 minutes means H-hour plus 1 hour and 15 minutes.
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Battles
  1. what was the group Rolling thunder about?
    Operation Rolling Thunder was a frequently interrupted bombing campaign that began on March 2, 1965 and lasted until the end of October 1968. During this period U.S. Air Force and Navy aircraft engaged in a bombing campaign designed to force North Vietnamese leader Ho Chi Minh to abandon his ambition to take over South Vietnam. The operation began primarily as a diplomatic signal to impress Hanoi with America’s determination, essentially a warning that the violence would escalate until the North Vietnamese took notice, and secondly it was intended to bolster the sagging morale of the South Vietnamese.
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Operation Enduring Freedom
  1. When did Operation Enduring Freedom begin?
    October 7, 2001,
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  2. What city was the first to be Liberated from the Taliban?
    Mazar-e-sharif
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  3. Afghanistan's capital, Kabul was liberated on what date?
    November 13, 2001
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  4. Who replaced the Marines of Task Force 58 on January 29, 2002 and where called "Task Force Rakkasan"?
    The 101St. Airborne Division.
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  5. During the Air War of Enduring Freedom how many sorties flew per day?
    200
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  6. What was operation Noble Eagle?
    On September 15, 2001 President Bush authorized the partial mobilization of reservists for homeland defense and civil support missions.
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Boot Camp - Basic Training
  1. What are the proper titles of those entrusted to train new recruits in each service branch?
    Drill Instructor (DI) for the Marine Corps, Military Training Instructor (MTI) for airmen, Drill Sergeant (DS) for soldiers, Recruit Division Commander (RDC) for sailors, and Company Commanders (CC) for the Coast Guardsmen.
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  2. What's the basic pay of a recruit?
    As of January 2004, the basic pay for a military recruit (before taxes and allotments) is $1104.00 per month.
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  3. How many recruits entering the military today have a high school diploma?
    Ninety-five percent have high school diplomas, versus 79% of the US national work force.
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  4. Where is Marine boot camp?
    MCRD Parris Island, SC and MCRD San Diego, CA. Parris Island trains male and female recruits, while San Diego is male only.
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  5. Where is Army boot camp?
    Where Army recruits attend basic training is dependent on the location of their follow-on Advanced Individual Training (AIT). In general, recruits are sent to: Fort Jackson, SC; Fort Benning, GA; Fort Knox, KY; Fort Leonard Wood, MO; Fort McClellan, AL; and Fort Sill, OK.
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  6. Where is Air Force boot camp?
    Lackland Air Force Base, near San Antonio, TX.
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  7. Where is Navy boot camp?
    Recruit Training Center Great Lakes, IL, outside of Chicago.
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  8. Where is Coast Guard boot camp?
    Coast Guard Training Center Cape May, NJ
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  9. Where do those who train recruits come from?
    All DIs, Drill Sergeants, RDCs, CCs and MTIs are volunteers, as it is a TEMPORARY JOB and not a CAREER. The average basic military training instructor has between five to 10 years of active duty experience and comes from paygrades E-5 and above. Contrary to the movies, recruit instructors aren't cold-hearted, raving maniacs -- they're professionals who have deep pride in their service branch and convey that to their charges. They are the best of the enlisted force. Volunteers for recruit instructor duty are screened for future job aptitude, time management skills, motivation, leadership ability, previous job performance; recommendations and endorsements from their previous command, and physical stamina -- a few even hold college degrees. Most take on the duty as a challenge to better themselves as leaders, while others look to the promotion opportunities it brings when they leave the drill field. All instructor candidates must also go through the rigors of the training ! course -- and it's tough. It's like going through boot camp again, except this time they'll be running it. Instructors must learn every detail of their service's recruit training outline, the goals they must set for themselves and their recruits; and pull from their own experiences before they're put in charge of their first batch of raw recruits.
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  10. Why is there recruit training?
    Simply put, recruit training (or "boot camp" or "basic training" if you like) is designed to transition civilians into basic soldiers, airmen, sailors, Marines and Coast Guardsmen. It's a tough job trying to get 80 or so INDIVIDUALS from different social, economic and ethnic backgrounds to think, act and work TOGETHER as ONE UNIT -- and top place the UNIT above one's self. Recruits have a lot to accomplish during their short time in basic training: service history, basic weapons indoctrination and qualification; close-order drill, customs and courtesies; military law, physical fitness, pay and benefits briefings; haircuts -- and a host of other items graduating and joining the ranks of their chosen service.
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  11. How long is Navy boot camp and where is it at?
    Navy boot camp for men and women lasts about eight weeks. Naval Training Center (NTC) Great Lakes is home to the US Navy\'s only Recruit Training Command (RTC). It\'s the largest military installation in Illinois and the largest training center in the Navy. The base includes 1,153 buildings on 1,628 acres and uses 50 miles of roadway to provide access to the Center\'s facilities. Great Lakes has been turning civilians into seamen and seamen into sailors for more than 80 years. From NTC\'s founding in 1911, it has maintained its position as the Navy\'s largest training facility. From World War I through today it has trained and sent to the fleet more than two million new sailors through its Recruit Training Command and nearly an equal number from its technical schools. Approximately 50,000 recruits pass through RTC Great Lakes annually with an estimated 15,000 recruits onboard the installation at any time.
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Civil War
  1. Who was the first officer of the Army of the Potomach to capture enemy colors?
    George Armstrong Custer
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  2. Who was the first Aeronaut in the Civil war,flying the first observation ballon ?
    Thaddeus S. C. Lowe
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  3. What was the military issue of enlisted underwear made from?
    Cotton and wool
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  4. What is a haversack?
    A cloth bag with shoulder strap used to carry food rations by the confederates and it lacked waterproofing
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  5. What type of sleeping protection was issued to infantrymen?
    A shelter half. Half of a tent meant to meet up with another man with half a tent. Odd man out. The men used their weapons as tent poles.
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  6. How many trunks of personal belongings where junior officers allowed?
    One
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  7. How where trunks of officers personal belongings transported?
    They were transported in baggage wagons.
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  8. What was the weight of gear that a soldier carried?
    30 to 40 pounds
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  9. Why were the Rebels sometimes called Butternuts?
    Because the dye in their gray uniforms turned a butternut color when exposed to the sun.
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  10. What did the soldiers use to make a corn shredder?
    An empty sardine can
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  11. What illnes did the organizer of the Iron Brigade, Rufus King suffer from?
    He suffered from occasional attacks of epilepsy.
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  12. Who was the Confederate Brig. Gen. nicknamed
    General James "Old One Wing" Martin, so named after he lost his right arm in the Mexican War, complains of sickness among the men of his North Carolina brigade.
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  13. Who was the Confederate chief of artillery that was said to utter this prayer after firing his cannons at the enemy:
    Episcopal priest William N. Pendleton exchanged his robe for a gray uniform and at age 51 became a captain in the Rockbridge Artillery. Quickly promoted, he became chief of Artillery on the staff of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston. He was so proud of his four 6-pounder brass smoothbore cannon, he named them Matthew, Mark, Luke , and John, claiming they " spoke a powerful language." On March 26, 1862, he was named Brigadier General in charge of Robert E. Lee's artillery. After the war, he returned to Grace Church in Lexington. His fighting men swore that when he signalled for a cannon to be fired, he bowed his head, and said this prayer: "Lord, preserve the soul while I destroy the body."
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  14. Who was the only Confederate officer to jump four ranks from Captain to Brig. Gen.?
    A captain by 1856, Meade moved on the following year to take over the Great Lakes survey, which he directed with extreme efficiency until 1861. Soon after the first guns sounded in the Civil War he received an appointment as brigadier general of volunteers. Within a few years he found himself in command of Union forces at Gettysburg.
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Vehicles
  1. The most common US tank used in Vietnam was?
    The M48.
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Vehicles
  1. What are the specs. of the M-46 Patton Tank used in the Korean War?
    Weight : 41.7 ton Dimensions:8.79m (28ft 10in) x 3.50m (11ft 6in) x 2.77m (9ft) Armor (max) : 102 mm Range : 148 km Speed (max - route) : (approx) 45 km/hr (28 mph) ......The rebuilt M-26 Heavy Tank became the M-46 or Patton Tank by the substitution of a new engine and transmission. Main gun : 90 mm MG : n 2 7.62mm Crew : 5
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Vehicles
  1. What was an observation balloon called in World War I?
    Sausage.
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Vehicles
  1. What was the name of the World War II German heavy tank destroyer, Jadpanzer IV?
    "Jagdtiger"
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  2. In WWII which branch of the US Armed Forces had the most Ships?
    The US Army!
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Vehicles
  1. What vehicle served valuable transport, reconnaissance and fire support functions in a variety of terrain in Vietnam?
    The M113 armored personnel carrier.
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Vehicles
  1. What were the specs of the M-26 Pershing Tank used in the Korean War?
    Weight : 41.7 ton Dimensions:8.79m (28ft 10in) x 3.50m (11ft 6in) x 2.77m (9ft) Armor (max) : 102 mm Range : 148 km Speed (max - route) : (approx) 45 km/hr (28 mph) Main gun : 90 mm MG : n 2 7.62mm Crew : 5
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Vehicles
  1. What was a PBR in Vietnam?
    The PBR, was a small, fast, lightweight craft, served as the main vessel of riverine operations. PBR\'s stopping and searching numerous junks, sampans, and other boats, and engaging in firefights with shore-based enemy soldiers.
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Vehicles
  1. What were the specs of the M-24 Chaffee Tank used in the Korean War?
    Weight : 18.4 ton Dimensions:5.49(18ft) x 2.95(9ft 8in) x 2.48m (8ft 2in) Armor (max) : 25 mm Range : 160 km (100miles) Speed: (speed-max): 56 km/hr. (34.8mph) Main gun :75 mm Crew : 5
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Coast Guard
  1. When did the Coast Guard adopt the “slash” for its cutters, boats, and aircraft?
    It was originally recommended in 1964 by the industrial design firm of Raymond Loewy/William Snaith, Incorporated and was adopted service-wide on 6 April 1967.
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  2. In what wars and conflicts did the Coast Guard serve?
    Quasi-War with France, War of 1812, Mexican War, Civil War, Spanish-American War, World War I, World War II, Korean War, Vietnam War, Mayaguez Incident, Grenada: Operation Urgent Fury, Panama: Operation Just Cause, Operations Desert Shield/Storm, Operation Iraqi Freedom
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  3. The US Coast guard was Commisioned on August 4,1790 as a "system of Revenue Cutters" What year did it recieve it's current name?
    In 1915, on January 28 the Revenue Cutter service was reamalgamated with the Lifesaving Service and was renamed as the US Coast Guard.
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  4. One Coast Guardsman has recieved the Medal Of Honor getting hundreds of Marines off a beachead in a cross fire. what is his name?
    Signalman First Class Douglas Albert Munro
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  5. What is the difference between the legal authority of Petty Officers and Comissioned Officers in the US Coast Guard as compaired to those in the US Navy?
    Due to it's constant Law Enforcement roll all E-4s and above in the US Coast Guard in the Official Line Of Duty have the same authority as a Federal Marshal.(this may have changed since 9/11/01)
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  6. What is the largest ship the Coast Guard has to date?
    The 420 foot Icebreaker.
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  7. What five formerly seperate overlapping federal agencies now comprise the US Coast Guard?
    The Revenue Cutter Service, The Lighthouse Service, The Steamboat Inspection Sevice, The Bureau of Navigation and the Lifesaving Service.
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  8. What was the name of the USCG Surveillance Task Force in Vietnam?
    The Market Time
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  9. What color were the USCG boats and ships painted in Vietnam to keep them hidden at night?
    Gray replacing the bright white color.
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  10. What is special about the 47 foot Motor lifeboat in the USCG?
    It is self righting and self bailing.
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  11. What does the abbreviation DMB stand for in the USCG?
    A data marker buoy.
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  12. What does ATON stand for in the USCG?
    Aids to Navigation.
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  13. Who has the nickname "Father of the Coast Guard"?
    Alexander Hamilton.
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  14. How many Hamilton Class High Endurance Cutters do the U.S. Coast Guard have?
    13
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  15. On the HH60 \"J\" Model USCG helicopter it carries a LLRU-20 life raft. How many persons can it hold?
    6
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  16. The rescue basket on a CG helicopter can hold how many pounds?
    600 pounds
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  17. The orange and blue stripe on the USCG Cutters are painted at what degree of angle?
    63 degrees.
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  18. Who was the most celebrated lifesaver in the world?
    Captain Joshua James (USLSS)
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  19. Who earned the Treasury's Department Gold Lifesaving Medal?
    Captain Joshua James - 1888 rescues
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  20. What is the origin of the saying "You have to go out but you don't have to come back"
    Because of the regulations of the lifesaving service of 1889. Article IV, section 252, page 58
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  21. What were the names of the three men that deserted the Point Judith Station on Sept. 4th 1906?
    John A. Streeter, F. Holberton, Elias C. Card
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  22. Who is the parent agency of the USCG?
    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) -- it is the only uniformed military service outside the Department of Defense. Before the establishment of DHS, the Coast Guard was an agency of the Department of Transportation (DoT), and the Treasury Department prior to that. In time of war, the USCG is integrated into the US Navy.
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  23. Where did Douglas Albert Munro, the only Coastguardsman to receive the MOH earn it?
    During the Guadalcanal Campaign.
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  24. Who led the Lifesaving Service after being re-birthed after the Civil War?
    Sumner L Kimball.
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  25. What was the name of the first Cutter to be tasked for rescue searches in 1831 by The Secretary of the Treasury?
    The Gallatin.
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  26. What was a mortar apparatus used for in early lifesaving in the Lifesaving Service?
    It was used to propel a rescue line to a floundering boat or a person in the water.
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  27. What is AMVER?
    It is a central computer-based voluntary global ship reporting system used worldwide by search and rescue authorities to arrange for assistance to persons in distress, sponsored by the Coast Guard.
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  28. What are the consequences for alerting the Coast Guard to a false distress call?
    6 years in prison, $250,000.00 fine, $5,000.00 civil fine, Reimbursing the Coast Guard for the cost of performing the search.
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  29. What is the operation cost of a single Coast Guard plane hourly that is involved in a search and rescue?
    $3,700.00 per hour and several may be used.
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  30. What is the operation cost of a USCG cutter hourly that is involved in a search and rescue?
    $1,550.00 per hour
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  31. What is the operation cost of a USCG small boat hourly that is involved in a rescue?
    $300.00 to $400.00 per hour.
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  32. What is the Coast Guard's motto?
    Semper Paratus, it means Always Ready.
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Life in the Military
  1. What's the nickname given to the kids of servicemembers?
    "Military Brat" -- or "Air Force Brat," "Navy Brat," "Marine Brat" or "Army Brat," if you want to be service-specific. It's a badge of honor.
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  2. What is the nickname given to the educational assistance program for military veterans?
    The GI Bill. It's official name, coined after WWII, was the "GI Bill of Rights."
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  3. What is the name of the daily newspaper for American GIs overseas?
    Stars and Stripes. It comes in three editions: Pacific, European and Middle East.
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  4. Who has the TOUGHEST job in the military?
    The spouse married to a servicemember. They have to keep the home-fires burning when their loved one is away.
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  5. What is the bedrock of military law for the entire US Armed Forces?
    The Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ).
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  6. What's the nickname given to the powdered drink mix served in military dining halls?
    Bug juice.
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  7. What recreational and support facilities are found on a typical base?
    It varies. Most have a recreation center, library, swimming pool, gym, athletic field, a nightclub, post office, snack bar, movie theater. Some installations have hobby shops, go-kart track, a golf course, skeet and trap range, recreational lake or camping area, a child care center, veterinarian office, thrift store and teen/youth club.
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  8. Who makes the uniforms, unit patches, insignia, metal emblems and other clothing items worn by GIs?
    Most military clothing and uniforms issued to servicemembers is produced by civilian manufacturers under contract to the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP). Servicemembers can also purchase commercially-produced replacement uniform items from their base uniform or tailor shop.
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  9. What is a commissary?
    A commissary is the supermarket/grocery store on a military base for servicemembers and their families.
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  10. Can an enlisted person become a commissioned officer?
    Yes! Those enlisteds that have leadership and college-level educational backgrounds are encouraged to apply for one of many officer accession programs, and trying for slots at their service academy.
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  11. Where is the LARGEST US military installation?
    White Sands Missile Range, NM has over 3.6 million acres -- most of it is desert.
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  12. Can you earn a college degree while serving in the military?
    Yes! All military services encourage their enlisted members to take off-duty college courses through their base education office. The service pays for their course tuition fees while the servicemember pays for all books and supplies. In some cases, servicemembers can take correspondence or online courses if they are in a remote or isolated area.
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  13. What is a technical school?
    Technical schools are where servicemembers learn their basic job specialty after recruit training. Some can be as short as six weeks, others can last over a year. Military members also receive on-the-job training and occasionally return to their technical school to learn advanced skills.
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  14. When are servicemembers paid?
    Payday for all US military members is on the 1st and 15th of each month.
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  15. What is the ASVAB?
    ASVAB is the Armed Forces Vocational Aptitude Battery, a series of tests developed by the Department of Defense in the 1960s. Recruiters use a combination of aggregate data from the ASVAB to determine what jobs and programs a potential recruit may be eligible for. There are currently three versions of the ASVAB. The version given to high school juniors and seniors (called Form 18/19) is not for enlistment in the military (although the test can be used for military enlistment); but primarily a tool to help school counselors and students discover where a student\'s basic aptitude lies. Approximately 900,000 students take high school ASVAB each year.
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  16. What is a "dining-in"?
    Formal military dinners are a tradition in all branches of the US armed services. In the Air Force and Navy, it is the dining-in; in the Army, the Regimental Dinner; in the Marine Corps and Coast Guard, it\'s Mess Night. The dining-in is an occasion for military members to meet socially at a formal military function. It enhances the esprit de corps of units, lightens the load of demanding day-to-day work, gives the commander an opportunity to meet socially with their subordinates and enables military members of all ranks to create bonds of friendship and better working relations through an atmosphere of good fellowship.
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  17. What is Space-A travel?
    Space Avaliable travel is convenient way for active duty, reservists and their dependents to travel in the US or overseas on military or contractor-operated passenger aircraft while on leave, in lieu of travel by commercial airlines. Much depends on the flexibility (and cash reserves) of the military member -- and good timing. Reservists, military retirees and certain Department of Defense civilian employees may use Space Available travel, provided they meet certain eligibility guidelines.
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  18. Do children living with their military parent(s) overseas still attend school?
    Yes! In most cases, when families are allowed to accompany a servicemember to their overseas assignment, their children attend schools on base operated by the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA). DoDEA operates 222 elementary, middle, and high schools in 13 foreign countries, seven states, and the US territories of Guam and Puerto Rico. All schools within DoDEA are fully accredited by US accreditation agencies. About 8,785 US Civil Service and local-hire teachers serve DoDEA\'s 102,600 students.
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  19. What's referred to by GIs as a "Big Chicken Dinner"?
    A Bad Conduct Discharge (BCD). In many ways, it\'s equivalent to a felony conviction. A BCD can severely affect a former servicemembers chances for appying for certain employment, securing a bond, applying for permits or running for public office.
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  20. Where can a military person register their DD2-14's to keep them safe and easily obtain a copy?
    The registrar of deeds
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  21. Who provides television and radio services for US Forces overseas?
    The American Forces Radio and Television Service (AFRTS). AFRTS' mission is to communicate Department of Defense policies, priorities, programs, goals and initiatives. AFRTS provides stateside radio and television programming, "a touch of home," to US service men and women, DoD civilians, and their families serving outside the continental United States, on contingency operations, and aboard Navy ships around the world. AFRTS uses seven satellites along with digital compression technology to provide multiple television and stereo audio services to over 1,000 outlets in more than 175 countries and US territories, and Navy ships.
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  22. Who provides for the recreational needs of servicemembers and their families?
    Each service branch has their own oraganization that provides morale, welfare and recreation (MWR) services -- Army MWR, Air Force Services Agency, Navy MWR, and Marine Corps Community Services (MCCS). In the USCG, MWR stands for \"Morale, Well-Being and Recreation,\" but provides the same services as the others. MWR is responsible for the operation of recreation facilities aboard military installations -- such as clubs and restaurants, hobby shops, libraries, bowling centers, recreation lounges, teen clubs, child development centers, swimming pools, golf courses, gyms, fitness centers and athletic fields. Each service MWR is a military-sponsored, profit-making organizations; as they receive no Congressional funding for their operations (except for base gyms, athletic fields and libraries which are operational necessities for military physical fitness and professional education). Use of MWR facilities is open to all military servicemembers, regardless of branch. MWR also! offers military discount tickets to major attractions and theme parks around the US and operates exclusive resorts (known as Armed Forces Recreation Centers - AFRCs) for military members and their families: Shades of Green on the grounds of Walt Disney World in Orlando; the New Sanno Hotel in the heart of Tokyo, Japan; the Dragon Hill Lodge in Seoul, ROK; the Hale Koa Hotel on the beach in Waikiki; and the Edelweiss Lodge and Resort in Garmisch, Germany. Other branch MWRs operate vacation beach cabanas, lodges, cabins, lake resorts and hotels exclusively for servicemembers.
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  23. What is the USO?
    The United Services Organization (USO) provides morale, welfare and recreation services to uniformed military personnel and their families. A Congressionally-chartered organization, the USO represents the American people by extending a \"touch of home\" to military members and their families assigned overseas and in the US. The USO is a non-profit charitable corporation and is not a part of the US Government or receives any direct government funding, but is endorsed by the President and Secretary of Defense. Each President has been the Honorary Chairman of the USO since its inception. Well-known for their travelling roadshows with the late Bob Hope and other celebrity entertainers, the USO also provides newcomer briefings for troops and family members to an overseas duty station, port vendor coordination for visiting US warships, cultural awareness seminars, airport service centers and troop lounges; high quality (and inexpensive) local tours, employment assistance for re! cently-discharged military servicemembers; telephone, internet and email capabilities; and USO Canteens and Centers which provide a relaxing, homey and wholesome alternative to the stress of military life.
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Weapons
  1. What antipersonnel weapon was developed as a result of the human wave attacks used by the North Korean army during the Korean War?
    M18 Claymore
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Weapons
  1. What was the greatest limitation of the M60 General Purpose Machine Gun in Vietnam?
    It's greatest limitation was the weight of its cartridge belts, which limited the amount of ammunition that could be carried into the field.
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Weapons
  1. What was unusual in the operation of the World War I "Davis Gun", an aircraft gun invented by US Navy Commander Davis?
    Recoilless gun
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Weapons
  1. What World War II US-made single-shot partisan's pistol, actually tool longer to load than to produce (7 1/2 seconds)?
    "Liberator"
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Weapons
  1. The Mark IIIA-1 handgrenade weighed how much during the Korea War?
    It weighed about 14 ounces.
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Weapons
  1. What missile launcher, was standard issue in Vietnam?
    The Redeye, a short-range shoulder-fired missile launcher, was standard issue.
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Weapons
  1. What did the French call their bayonet?
    Rosalie
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Weapons
  1. How many rounds did a M3A1 Grease Gun magazine hold used in the Korean War?
    30 rounds.
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Weapons
  1. What was a hand grenade or a bomb called in World War I?
    An egg.
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Weapons
  1. What was the most common field support weapon used in Vietnam?
    M19 60mm Mortar. This portable mortar fired as many as 30 rounds of high-explosive, smoke, or illumination rounds per minute. It had an effective range of approximately 45- 2000 yards.
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Weapons
  1. What kind of weapon is the M1911A1 used in the Korean War?
    It is a.45 caliber semiautomatic pistol, magazine-fed recoil-operated hand weapon.
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Weapons
  1. What machine gun firing linked .223cal M-16 ammo was adopted by the SEALs but rejected by all other branches due to high maintenance requirements?
    The 'Stoner' Machine Gun,brainchild of Eugene Stoner who invented the AR-10/AR-15/M-16 while working for Armalite. It was belt fed disintigrating link firing 800-1000 rpm and could fire from 150round clip on boxes or continuous belt.
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Weapons
  1. What was referred to officially as 'No. 5' in WW1?
    The Mills bomb was introduced in May 1915 and became the dominant British grenade for the remainder of the war. Weighing 1.25 lb, the Mills bomb's exterior was serrated so that when it detonated it broke into many fragments: thus, a fragmentation bomb.
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  2. The most famous wartime pistol was?
    The German Luger.
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Weapons
  1. What weapon did the US marines use as a sniper rifle in the Korean War?
    M1903A1
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Weapons
  1. What kind of gun was the Lewis Gun?
    A machine gun designed in the United States in 1911 by U.S. Army Colonel Isaac Newton Lewis (and based upon an earlier overly-complex design by Samuel McLean), the Lewis gun comprised an early light machine gun widely adopted by British and Empire forces from 1915 onwards.
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Weapons
  1. What were the Automatic weapons used in the Korean War?
    Browning Automatic Rifle BAR Japanese WWII submachine guns M3A1 Grease Gun Machine Carbine, 9mm Owen, Mark 1 Machine Carbine, 9mm Sten, Mark 2 PPS43 submachine gun Shpagin PPSh41 submachine gun (burp gun) Thompson Submachine Gun Tokarev Semiautomatic 7.62mm, SVT40 Type 50 Chinese 7.62mm submachine gun
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  2. What type of grenades were used in the Korean War?
    Communist Hand Grenades US Hand Grenades US Rifle-mounted Grenade Launchers US Rifle-mounted Ground Signals
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Weapons
  1. What was a 'stick' grenade?
    A grenade, where the fuse was lit when the grenade left the handle (stick) to which it was attached.
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  2. What was a 'cricket ball' grenade?
    A cylindrical grenade, was ignited by striking the grenade like a match before it was promptly dispatched skywards.
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  3. Which grenade was liable to explode prematurely if it came into contact with an object while in the act of being thrown?
    The Mark 1 caused widespread distrust given that it was liable to explode prematurely if it came into contact with an object while in the act of being thrown.
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  4. What were 'jam-tin' bombs?
    They were literally made out of jam tins, each was packed with gun-cotton or dynamite, together with pieces of scrap metal. A length of fuse would project through the top of the tin, with each inch of fuse giving approximately 1.25 seconds delay.
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  5. What weapon,perfected in the US during WWI and produced in quantity was never issued for fear of being copied yet saw much usage in later wars?
    The BAR-Browning Automatic Rifle
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Weapons
  1. Why does the World war II Japanese 99 LMG shoot 7.7mm Rounds.Instead of 7mm rounds?
    Prior to World War Two the most common ammunition used by Japanese rifles and light machine guns was 6.5 millimeter. I have found no reference to 7 millimeter cartridges or to weapons chambered for them. Below is a partial list of sources for the Type 99 7.7 mm Light Machine Gun. http://www.dragonsoffire.com/type_99_paratroopLMG.htm http://www.dragonsoffire.com/type_99_improvements.htm http://www.pasadenaisd.org/phs/Sklenarik/Projects/Group7/wood.htm http://www.pasadenaisd.org/phs/Sklenarik/Projects/Group7/type99.htm
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  2. Did Adolf Hitler have plans to use chemical weapons against allied troops?
    Chemical Warfare During the First World War chlorine, then phosgene, and then mustard gas were used on the battlefront causing an estimated 1 million casualties. Adolf Hilter was "gassed" in WWI, which may explain why the Germans refrained from using chemical warfare in the Second World War. In 1936 Dr. Gerhart Schrader, a chemist at the German company, I.G. Farben, while searching for chemicals to be used as pesticides, discovered the nerve agent tabun. Tabun is known in the US as GA, for "German" agent "A." Two years later he discovered the nerve gas sarin, known as GB. During the Second World War Germany produced 78,000 tons of chemical warfare agents, Japan produced 8,000 tons, and the U.S. made 146,000 tons. Chemical weapons were stationed by both Germany and the Allies in battle theaters, in case the other side used these weapons first. The deterent strategy worked. After the war much of the chemical weapon stockpile was dumped into the ocean.
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Korean War
  1. Who relieved American General Douglas MacArthur from his military command?
    On April 11, 1951, President of the United States Harry S. Truman relieved General Douglas MacArthur of his command.
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  2. What communist dictator ruled North Korea in 1950?
    Kim ll Sung
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  3. What year did the Korean War end?
    It never did,only a cease-fire was established!
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  4. What did the Korean Forces use to communicated with causing terror?
    A bugle.
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  5. What was a first in history for woman marine Reservists in the Korean War?
    They were mobilized. A "W" ws placed before their serial numbers to identify them as a woman.
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  6. What date did the Korean War start?
    June 25, 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea.
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  7. How many Korean War participants received the MOH?
    131
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  8. What state has the highest number of Korean War Veterans?
    California
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  9. What infantry division suffered the most losses?
    2nd. Infantry Division - 7,094
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  10. Who was president at the onset of the Korean War?
    President Truman
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  11. Why was the Korean War deemed "Truman's War"?
    Because he did not get a Declaration of War from Congress before he sent troops to Korea.
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  12. When was the first engagement of North Korea/US in the Korean War?
    July 5
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  13. Who was the highest ranking POW in the Korean War?
    MG William F. Dean.
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Vehicles
  1. What is a HUMVEE?
    The American HMMWV or High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle, the succesor to the Jeep.
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  2. What is the designation of the British Alvis-built, tracked, armored, anti-armored personnel carrier vehicle?
    "Scimitar"
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  3. What is the production successor to the British "Chieftain" tank?
    "Challenger"
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  4. What is the maximum speed of a Papa?
    44.7 knots
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  5. What's the GI nickname for the 425-gallon water trailer?
    "Water buffalo"
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Marine Corps
  1. How did the Marine come to have the nickname 'Jarhead'?
    Military slang for a member of the United States Marine Corps. The slang originated during WWII when the Mason Jar Company started making their helmets and refers to the similarity that the shape of the helmet shares with a jar as well as the typical haircut new recruits are given.
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  2. When did the Marine Corps start using the Campaign Cover (Smokey Bear)?
    The unique style of hat worn by today’s Marine Corps Drill Instructors, shows a direct line from the U.S. Army felt hat of 1855. As the hat’s crown became shorter and the brim became wider, it was referred to as a campaign hat. As the Army moved out onto the frontier (1870-1890), various styles were issued, but the major complaint of soldiers was that the hat was black and hot. (It was not until 1888 that the U.S. Army finally issued a brown campaign hat. The U.S. Cavalry never wore a white campaign hat except in the movies.) During the war with Spain in 1898, the Marine Corps fielded a battalion of Marines who were the first troops to land in Cuba. Wearing their traditional blue uniforms of the period, Marines requested campaign hats from the U.S. Army to help combat the tropical heat and humidity. These were the first "field hats" worn by Marines, and would also be worn in the Philippines; in China, during the Boxer Rebellion, and later during the Philippine Insurrection. At this time, the Marine Corps Eagle, Globe and Anchor was normally worn, pinned to the left side in the British fashion. In 1912, the Marines introduced their own style of field hat, with brim folded over and stitched to give the hat the appearance of a thicker brim. Marines who have worn the campaign cover, pride themselves on keeping the brim perfectly straight. The field hat remained in service until the beginning of WWII, when felt became a critical war material. During the war and after, the campaign cover was used exclusively by Marine competitive marksmanship teams. The present campaign cover was reintroduced in 1956, for use by Drill Instructors as a mark of their professionalism. In 1966 the women Marine DI's were allowed to start wearing it too. Only two hat cords are authorized for wear on the Marine Corps campaign cover. A gold cord for flag officers (generals), and scarlet and gold for officers– Both warrant and commissioned. The U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force have also adopted the use of campaign covers in recruit training.
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  3. What rabid anti-communist senator, known as "Tail-Gunner Joe", served in the US Marines?
    Senator Joseph McCarthy
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  4. "Gunny" is what E-7 US Marine Corps rank?
    Gunnery Sergeant
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  5. Which US Marine faced prosecution for the Iran-Contra Scandal?
    Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North.
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  6. Why are Marines called 'Leather Necks'?
    When acting as boarding party in the days of sail they wore leather around their necks as protection from saber cuts.
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  7. What island was relatively undefended when Allied Forces first arrived then was bypassed and in the months that followed heavily fortified costing huge loss of life when it was finally invaded?
    Iwo Jima
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  8. In 1985 - 1986 women Marines were ordered to do two things what where they?
    Posses a sword and be trained how to use it and qualify with the M-16A1 rifle.
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  9. In 1966 woman Marines received an issue of which part of the DI uniform?
    The "Smokey" cover.
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  10. Who was the first woman in the Marine Corp?
    It was Lucy Brewer. She actually enlisted as George Baker. And served on Old Ironside.
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  11. During the War of 1812 with England, the British burned down nearly every public building in Washington.(including the White House and the Capital). What Building was spared from the burnings?
    The Marine barracks out of respect.
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  12. Who was the first Negro to be commissioned in the United States Marine Corps?
    Fredrick C. Branch of Charlotee, NC.
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  13. What is the crucible?
    A 54 hour rigorous training exercise of all of the things a recruit learns in bootcamp.
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  14. What year was the regulation adopted for the outline of specifications for the sword the non-commissioned officers wear today?
    1859
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  15. What is the oldest post in the Marine Corps.
    "8th and I".
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  16. What is the same about all Marines?
    They are all riflemen.
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  17. The red stripe on the blue trousers of the U.S. Marine NCO and Officers commemorates what in the U.S. Mexican War?
    The blood shed in the Halls of Montezuma.
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  18. The emblem of the Marine Corps eagle, globe and anchor was adopted in what year?
    1868
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  19. What happened on January 10, 1995?
    2,600 U.S. Marines were deployed to Somalia for operation United Shield to assist in the final withdrawal of UN peacekeeping troops from Somalia.
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  20. Where is the largest concentration of Marines OUTSIDE the continental United States?
    Okinawa, Japan at Marine Corps Bases Cp. S.D. Butler, Cp. Schwab, Cp. Hansen, Cp. Lester, Cp. Foster, Cp. Kinser, Cp. McTureous, Cp. Gonsalves and MCAS Futenma.
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  21. Who was the first woman Marine to be selected for the Naval Aviation training?
    2nd. Lieutenant Sarah Deal.
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  22. Other than Okinawa, where else does the Marine Corps have bases overseas?
    There are two USMC installations on Mainland Japan: Combined Arms Training Center, Cp. Fuji, about 2 hours from Tokyo at the foot of Japan's most famous landmark; and MCAS Iwakuni, 25 miles southwest of the city of Hiroshima.
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  23. Marines have engaged in combat against the enemy on every continent of the world except two. What are they?
    Australia and Antarctica.
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  24. Who was the only Marine to die on Antarctica?
    Capt. Rayburn A. Hudman, a co-pilot aboard a Navy P2V-2N Neptune aircraft attached to the Antarctic Development Squadron SIX (VX-6), was killed in October 1956 along with the pilot and aircrew when it crashed during whiteout conditions at McMurdo Station.
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  25. How many MOH's did Marine Smedley Butler earn?
    Two
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  26. What was the nickname of Marine General Holland M. Smith that led the invasion of the Battle of Iwo Jima.
    "Howlin Mad"
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  27. How many Marines earn the MOH in the Battle of Iwo Jima?
    27
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  28. General Vandergrift commanded what division of Marines in the Battle of Guadalcanal?
    The 1st Marine Division and a regiment of the 2nd. Marine Division.
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  29. How many Marines landed on Guadalcanal?
    11,000 Marines
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  30. What did the Marine fighter pilots dubb themselves after the air field at Guadalcanal became useable?
    The "Cactus Air Force".
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  31. Who became the first ace in the "Cactus Air Force"?
    Marine Captain John Smith. He also received the Medal of Honor.
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  32. Who gets the first two pieces of cake on the Marine Corps Birthday?
    The Oldest Marine and the Youngest Marine.
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  33. What is the most outstanding custom in the Marine Corps?
    It is simply "being a Marine" and all that it implies. It is that pride which sets a United States Marine apart from the men of other armed services. It is not taught in manuals, yet it is the most impressive lesson a recruit learns in boot camp.
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  34. On the morning of 1 January of each year what happens?
    Serenading the Commandant. Commencing with the last New Year's Day of the Civil War, on the morning of 1 January of each year the Marine Band serenades the Commandant of the Marine Corps at his quarters and received hot buttered rum and breakfast in return.
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  35. What year did the Marine Corps adopt the rope into the emblem?
    Eagle Globe and Anchor. The emblem of the United States Marine Corps adopted in 1868 under Brigadier General Commandant Jacob Zeilen following the Civil War. Prior to that time the Marines wore the Army infantry horn with a red field in the center and the letter “M” in Old English script. In 1776, the device consisted of a "foul anchor" of silver or pewter. The foul anchor still forms a part of the emblem today. (A foul anchor is an anchor which has one or more turns of the chain around it). Changes were made in 1798, 1821, and 1824.
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  36. What former naval air station is still known officially as Admiral Mark Mitscher Field?
    Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, San Diego, CA
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  37. Who was the first Marine?
    Joshua Carpenter, who on November 10, 1775 was Commissioned to form the first units of the Continental Marines.
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  38. Where were the Marines born?
    At Tunn Tavern in Philadelphia, Pa. the Proprieter and Brewmaster Joshua Carpenter was commissioned and tasked to form the first two units on 11/10/1775.
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  39. Where did the Creed come from and When did it begin?
    Accredited to Major General William H. Rupertus, USMC (Deceased) and still taught to Marines undergoing Basic Training at the Recruit Depots at San Diego and Parris Island, was first published in the San Diego Marine Corps Chevron March 14, 1942.
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  40. What are the requirements to be enlisted in sniper school?
    Marines applying for sniper status must not only be mentally sound but they also must be physically fit. They also must be an expert shooter from the infantry Military Occupational Specialty. To become a sniper, applicants must pass a two-day screening. This includes a physical fitness test, swim qualifications, land navigation, ruck run, and night observation exercise.
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  41. Why is the star of David on the NCO sword?
    First, the star is not a Star of David because it is geometrically different. The Star of David does not consist of two triangles combined together, but rather two, separate, interlocking triangles (which, in recent history, and often when displayed in one-color designs, usually does appear to be two triangles combined together). We cannot absolutely confirm the history of the star; however, we do know that the blade specifications for both the U.S. and British military swords require the six-pointed star with the word "Proved" etched on the blade. As best we can tell, the specification for the six-pointed star is historical in nature and was likely used to signify that the blade was manufactured using the Damascus steel method. Today, there is no requirement for Damascus steel blades; however, the six-pointed "Proved" star is required in the etch to signify that the blade meets the current military specifications. Even this use has lost its meaning, however, since replica swords intended only for wall-mounting incorrectly bear the symbol. Damascus steel was perfected by the Persians and was reportedly encountered by Alexander the Great three centuries before Christ. The Persians used the six-pointed star during these non-modern times. The Persian blade-making process of folding the steel many times - even hundreds of times - to layer the steel resulted in extremely tough blades with both strength and resilience. The term "Damascus steel" came from western traders first encountering the steel in Damascus. Today, U.S. military blades are purely ornamental and ceremonial in nature. The modern-day swords and sabers are certainly not made with Damascus steel blades and are not made to withstand blade-to-blade contact. Damascus steel blades today would cost tens of thousands of dollars to forge, and we know of no one who offers Damascus steel blades.
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Weapons
  1. How did KA-BAR get it's name?
    Soon after its introduction in the mid-1920's, the KA-BAR trademark became widely known and respected. There have been many versions of how the KA-BAR name came to be, but all evidence points to a letter received from a fur trapper. This particular fur trapper's testimonial turned out to be the most significant ever received by the company. He wrote, in very rough English, that his gun had jammed and that he had therefore relied on his knife to kill a wounded bear that was attacking him. In thanking the company for their quality product the trapper described using his knife to kill the bear. All that was legible of his scrawled writing was "k a bar". The company was so honored by this testimonial that they adopted this phrase and used it as their trademark, KA-BAR.
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  2. The orange-coloured magazine on the new AKS and AKD Soviet assault rifles is made of what material?
    plastic
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  3. What does "AUG" mean in designating the new Steyr produced assault rifle of Austria?
    "Armee Universal Gewehr" ("Army Universal Gun")
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  4. What man-pack anti-aircraft missile is carried by US Army and Marine infantry?
    "Redeye"
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  5. The "Tampell" is what Mideast nation's 120mm mortar?
    Israel
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  6. What is the size of the cannon on the AC-130U Spooky?
    105mm
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  7. What is the name for the BGM-109 missile?
    Tomahawk
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  8. What is the Russian version of the B-1B Lancer?
    Tu-160 Blackjack
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  9. What is the size of the Bushmaster chain gun on the M2A3 Bradley?
    25mm
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  10. What is the name of the GAU-8A 30mm Gatling gun on the A-10?
    Avenger
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  11. What is the Russian copy of the C-130?
    An-12 Cub
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  12. What is the Russian copy of the B-29?
    Tu-4 Bull
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  13. What is C4?
    American-made plastic explosive
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  14. What does AWACS stand for?
    Airborne Warning And Control System
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  15. What is the main gun on an Iowa-class BB?
    16-inches
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  16. How many 21-inch torpedo tubes are there on a 688I?
    4 tubes
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  17. How many rockets does a M270 MLRS carry?
    12 rockets per launcher
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  18. How many Trident IIs does an Ohio-class SSBN carry?
    24
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  19. What size of ammunition does the Israeli Uzi use?
    9mm
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  20. What is meant by “spray and pray”?
    The shooter lets loose a full magazine full of bullets on fully automatic and prays that they hit a bad guy.
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  21. Why were the Yankee Notch SSGNs retired?
    They carried SS-N-21 Sampsons, which were nuclear cruise missiles similar to our Tomahawks. Nuclear arms reduction treaties made both superpowers give up some nukes. We were able to keep our Tomahawks because they also could carry a conventional warhead while the Sampson was taken out of service because they only carried a nuclear warhead.
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  22. What is a Long Tom?
    M1 155m gun - It combined long range, accuracy, and hitting power with a well designed mobile carriage.
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  23. What is the difference between a Machine gun and a Sub-Machine Gun?
    Machine Guns fire rifle ammo,Sub-Machine Guns fire pistol ammo.
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  24. What Famous machine gun was used by Clyde Barrow and was also used to kill him?
    The BAR,(Thompsons fire pistol ammo and are 'Sub-Machine Guns')
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  25. What kind of ammunition size and bullet type will the XM29 use when it is complete?
    The XM29's unique, full-solution target acquisition/fire control system combined with precision 20mm air bursting ammunition provide a significant overmatch capability against today's threats, resulting in a dramatic increase in soldier survivability. The XM29 is one of the premier programs within the new Program Manager Soldier Weapons Office in the Program Executive Office Soldier Systems. The OICW fires the same round as an M16A2 with the lower barrel, 5.56 mm, and can fire in either a single shot or two-round burst. The upper barrel fires a 20 mm high-explosive air-bursting fragmentation round at a distance of more than half a mile away. A six-round magazine in the butt of the rifle holds the HE rounds. The 20 mm round has a dual warhead which makes it lethal on both sides and gives complete coverage when it explodes. The round is air-bursting, and explodes at 1.5 meters above the target. This works especially well if the enemy is hiding behind an object or is lying prone on the ground.
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Middle East Excursion
  1. Why does the military use POGs instead of coins in the Middle East?
    Because the coins are to heavy and to expensive to ship.
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  2. What are the military personnel collecting and trading in the Middle East?
    POGs
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  3. Saddam has been sole ruler since what year?
    1979
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  4. What is an EGBU-28
    It is a bunker buster bomb that can penetrate hardened targets before exploding and has a global positioning system on it so it can be dropped in foul weather.
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  5. Operation Mountain Blizzard took place in what country?
    Afghanistan. It began in Jan. 2004 and ended March 12, 2004.
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National Guard
  1. When did the National Guard become a reserve component of the US Army?
    1903
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  2. Are National Guard Units under State or Federal control?
    They are under the control of both State and Federal authority.
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  3. How much fuel does one fuel cell carry on a Boeing KC-135 ?
    7 tons of fuel
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  4. How many automobile tires would you be able to make from the landing gear tires of a KC-135 jet-tanker transport plane? 8 main gear wheels and 2 nose wheels
    100 tires
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  5. During aerial refueling at 600 miles per hour, the boom operator is how many feet above the nose of a Boeing B-52 bomber?
    20 feet
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  6. What Act proclaimed that all states rename their militia the National Guard?
    The National Defense Act of 1916
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  7. How many National Guardsmen were mobilized for Korea?
    More than 138,000
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  8. How many National Guardsmen were called to serve in Desert Storm?
    63,000
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  9. What role are the National Guard playing during the current war?
    More than 50,000 Guardsmen were called up to protect the US and fight terrorism abroad.
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  10. What is the National Guards dual mission?
    Provide the states with units trained and equipped to protect life and property and providing the nation with units ready to defend the US and its interests around the world.
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  11. The Air National Guard was established as a separate component of the Air Force in what year?
    1947
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  12. When were women authorized to be enlisted or appointed other than nurses to the Air National Guard?
    November 8, 1967
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  13. Who was the first woman to join the Air National Guard ?
    Capt. Norma Parsons Erb - A nurse, joined the NY Air National Guard
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  14. When did the first woman join the Air National Guard?
    October of 1956
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  15. What is the motto of the 129th Rescue Wing?
    "That Others May Live".
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  16. Where is technical training provided for the Air National Guard?
    The Air Force and it may qualify for credits toward an Associate degree.
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  17. The 144th Fighter Wing's mission is to provide what?
    To provide air defense protection for California from the Mexican border to Ukiah utilizing the F-16 Fighting Falcon jet fighter aircraft. The 144th also responds to state emergencies when requested by the Governor of California.
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  18. The defense officers that will man the base at Camp Denali were trained and will graduate from were?
    The Ground -based Midcourse Defense Center Advanced Course in Colorado.
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  19. In 1941, the Iowa National Guard Pilots of the 124th patrolled the Gulf of Mexico, searching for what?
    German submarines
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  20. What is the National Guard?
    The National Guard is the organized militia reserved to the states by the Constitution of the United States under Article 1, Section 8. In peacetime, the National Guard is commanded by the governor of each respective state or territory.
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Navy
  1. What do US Navy sailors affectionately call their round white caps?
    "dixie cup"
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  2. What was the worlds first nuclear powered aircraft carrier?
    USS Enterprise, Launched in 1961.
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  3. Who developed the computer programming language called ADA and discovered the first computer bug?
    Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper (1906-1992). The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer, USS HOPPER (DDG 70), is named in her honor.
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  4. What food item (with NO SUBSTITUTIONS) has been supplied to the US Navy since its inception?
    Butter. Unlike the other armed services, you won't find a stick or tub of margarine in any galley ashore or afloat.
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  5. When and where was the first US aircraft carrier launch?
    Aboard the USS Langley on Oct 17, 1922.
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  6. What does the Navy use for radar coverage like the Air Force uses the E-3B Sentry?
    E-2C Hawkeye
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  7. What are the general occupational designations for E1 to E3 paygrades in the Navy?
    Seaman (SN), Airman (AN), Fireman (FN), Constructionman (CN), Hospitalman (HN) and Dentalman (DN).
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  8. What two Navy enlisted ratings have remained in continuous use since 1797?
    Boatswain's Mate (BM) and Gunner's Mate (GM).
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  9. What are the two NEWEST Navy enlisted ratings established in the 21st Century?
    Cryptologic Technician-Networks (CTN) and Culinary Specialist (CS).
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  10. What rating is responsible for the maintenance of all ENLISTED service records?
    Personnelman (PN).
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  11. Who gets "promoted" and "advanced" in the Navy?
    OFFICERS are PROMOTED, ENLISTEDS are ADVANCED.
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  12. What submarine sent the historic radio message, "Underway on nuclear power"?
    USS Nautilus (SSN 571).
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  13. When was the grade of Chief Petty Officer (CPO) established?
    April 1, 1893.
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  14. What is a brig?
    It's a jail -- a place aboard ship to confine prisoners. In the days of sail, sailors were sent to the ship's brig for major and minor infractions. In the modern Navy, a brig can be afloat (usually aboard aircraft carriers) or ashore at a major naval base command, and is staffed by military corrections personnel. Also called Correctional Custody Units (CCUs), brigs ashore also hold prisoners from other service branches -- and staffed with Army, Air Force and Marine Corps correctional personnel. Those sent to the brig are usually awaiting trial by courts-martial or sentenced there as a result of courts-martial proceedings for one year or less. Brigs are also used as holding or overflow facilities for Federal prisoners, but they are monitored and supervised by US Bureau of Prisons personnel. Military prisoners sentenced to more than one year of confinement are sent to the US Disciplinary Barracks (USDB) on Ft. Leavenworth, KS.
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  15. What rating is responsible for the maintenance of all OFFICER service records?
    Yeoman (YN).
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  16. Until 1997, where else did the Navy train its recruits besides Naval Training Center Great Lakes, IL?
    Navy boot camps were also located at Naval Training Centers San Diego, CA and Orlando, FL. Both bases were closed under the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) commission.
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  17. What US Presidents served in the Navy?
    John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson, Richard M. Nixon, Gerald R. Ford, Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush.
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  18. What was first US battleship?
    USS Maine, commissioned in 1890 and sunk eight years later from sabotage in Havana Harbor.
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  19. What is the most famous, best known, most historically significant battleship?
    USS Missouri, "Mighty Mo".
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  20. What are the general enlisted occupational communities in the Navy?
    Deck/administration, engineering, aviation, construction (Seabees), medical and dental.
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  21. What warships were part of the first nuclear-powered naval task group?
    USS Enterprise (CVAN 65), USS Bainbridge (CGN 25) and USS Long Beach (CGN 9) comprised Task Group 60.1
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  22. What is NCIS?
    It stands for Naval Criminal Investigative Service, a worldwide federal law enforcement agency whose mission is to protect and serve the Navy and Marine Corps.
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  23. Who was the "Father of the Nuclear Navy"?
    Admiral Hyman G. Rickover.
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  24. What's an "airdale"?
    Airdale is a nickname for sailors and officers in the aviation community
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  25. What was the largest American naval installation outside of the US?
    Subic Bay Naval Station in the Republic of the Philippines was the largest naval facility for nearly 100 years. Originally founded as a Spanish outpost in the 1500s by the Conquistadors, Subic Bay served the US fleet and its allies through the Spanish-American War, World Wars I and II, Korea, Vietnam and Desert Storm. Subic was a sprawling, self-contained installtion that included a shipyard, drydock facilities, a major supply depot, hospital, an air station and runway; ammunition storage depot, a Marine guard company, schools for military children and family housing. Sadly, Subic Bay -- along with USAF's Clark Air Base in Angeles City -- suffered heavy damage by volcanic ash from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991. An anti-American bases mood in the Philippines prior to and in the wake of the eruption also sealed the fate of Subic and Clark. Both bases were returned to Philippine control and abandoned in 1993.
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  26. What is a 'Brown Shoe'?
    Due to the color of leather used for flight gear shoes for many years,'Airdales' were also referred to as 'Brown Shoes'
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  27. When was the Department of the Navy Formed and what Department ran naval affairs prior to then?
    April 30,1798 ,the War Department.
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  28. When was the US Navy formed?
    Though it traces it's birthday to the founding of the Continental Navy, The first US Naval Vessels were not ordered built and manned until 1794.
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  29. What are "rating badges"?
    In 1841, insignia called "distinguishing marks" were first prescribed as part of the official Navy enlisted uniform. An eagle and anchor emblem, forerunner of the modern rating badge, was the first distinguishing mark. In 1886 rating badges were established, and some 15 specialty marks were also provided to cover the various ratings. In April 1893, Petty Officers were reclassified and the rating of Chief Petty Officer was established. Until 1949 rating badges were worn on the right or left sleeve, depending on whether the person concerned was on the starboard or port watch. Since February 1948, all distinguishing marks have been worn on the left sleeve between the shoulder and elbow. The Navy and Coast Gaurd are the only two service branches that wear rating badges, showing the occupation and rank of the wearer.
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  30. What color is "navy blue"?
    Blue has not always been navy blue. In fact it wasn\'t until 1745 that the expression navy blue meant anything at all. In that year several British officers petitioned the Admiralty for adaptation of new uniforms for it\'s officers. The first lord requested several officers to model various uniforms under consideration so he could select the best. He then selected selected several uniforms of various styles and colors to present to King George II for final decision. King George, unable to decide on either style or color, finally chose a blue and white because they were the favorite color combinations of the first lord\'s wife, the Duchess of Bedford.
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  31. Who was the youngest naval officer ever promoted to Rear Admiral (RADM)?
    Admiral Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr. (1920-2000). At age 44, he was the youngest naval officer ever promoted to Rear Admiral. At 49, Zumwalt was the youngest four-star Admiral in US naval history, and the youngest to serve as Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). During Zumwalt's tenure as CNO (1970-1974), he helped usher the Navy into the nuclear age by allowing more privileges to improve morale and retention; worked for equal opportunity for sailors, and rescinded archaic and demeaning regulations. Many of his famous "Z-Grams" are now incorporated into current Navy regulations and policies.
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  32. Why do sailors refer to the toilet aboard ship as the "head"?
    In the days of wooden sailing vessels, there wasn't any indoor plumbing on land or at sea. Sailors took care of business while hanging over the edge of the ship by ropes or on a platform - always at the bow. So why the bow? Because sailing ships had to have the wind coming from behind them to power their sails. Thus, if the sailor chose the stern, or back of the ship, the wind would be coming toward him. And, well...you wouldn't *spit* into the wind, would you?
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  33. Who has RATE and RANK in the Navy?
    It's pretty much a matter of who's using the terms. In the land forces (Army, Air Force and Marine Corps), the term "rank" applies to officers and enlisted. In the Navy and Coast Guard's case, "rank" applies only to OFFICERS. Enlisteds in both services have "rate".
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  34. What's a "sea daddy"?
    It's someone who takes a less-experienced crewmember under his or her wing and expert tutelage. Often, and traditionally, when a CPO (E7) takes care of and educates a boot Ensign. Nowadays, it's known as "mentoring".
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  35. How many five-star Fleet Admirals (FADM) were there?
    Only four were appointed to the rank in WWII: William Daniel Leahy, Ernest Joseph King, Chester William Nimitz and William Frederick Halsey, Jr. For years, the Navy had the rank of 4-star Admiral (ADM). Now for the first time, the service had 5-star Fleet Admirals. By an act of Congress approved in December 1944, the grade of Fleet Admiral was established. Four were nominated by the President, and with the advice and consent of the Congress, they were appointed by him and served in that grade until they died. Each of them followed a differently patterned naval career. Only eight years of seniority separated them. They all served as younger officers when the Navy was making its expansion in aviation and submarine development. One of these officers was essentially a destroyer officer and aviator; another was a submariner with European training in diesel propulsion. One had almost all his sea duty in big ships and only one had a seagoing career in the surface, submarine and aviation branches of the Navy. Three of them went on to serve as Chief of Naval Operations (CNO).
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  36. What's the official name of the "Blue Angels"?
    US Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron
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  37. What was the name of the 1st. Ironclad ship?
    The USS Montior.
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  38. What does NMCB mean?
    Naval Mobile Construction Battalion.
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  39. How many tons of heavy explosives were dropped by the naval ships and pilots in the days before the Marines landed on D-Day in the Marshall Islands?
    Approximately 6,000 tons of heavy explosives.
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  40. How many days did the Navy ships and Naval Pilots bomb before the Marines landed on D-Day in the Marshall Islands?
    3
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  41. What MOS did the Navy give to a woman before any other military force?
    Naval Aviator. In 1974 six woman earned their wings as Naval Aviators.
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  42. The department of the Navy is the official time keeper of the the country. Where is the master clock housed?
    U.S. Naval Observatory, Washington D.C.
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  43. What does GMT stand for?
    Greenwich Mean Time or (Zulu Time)
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  44. What does UTC stand for?
    Coordinated Universal Time. It replaces Zulu Time (GMT) It is an accurate time scale due to an increased accuracy in measuring the rotation of the earth.
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  45. What naval command is responsible for providing strategic sealift and ocean transportation for all military forces overseas?
    The Military Sealift Command (MSC) is the ocean transportation provider for the Department of Defense. MSC is a Navy command and is one of three component commands reporting to the joint-service US Transportation Command, known as USTRANSCOM. MSC vessels are unarmed, commanded and crewed by US Civil Service civilian mariners, with a small military detachment aboard for communications, administration and cargo support services. MSC ships have a gold, white and blue stripe painted around their exhaust stacks and display the MSC crest to distinguish them from Navy warships.
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  46. What Navy aircraft squadron was assigned to support OPERATION DEEP FREEZE for over 30 years?
    Antarctic Development Squadron SIX (VX/VXE-6). The squadron flew the gamut of Navy aircraft to support Navy and US Antarctic Program research teams, with fixed-wing aircraft such as the UF-1L Albatross, U-1B Otters, LC-47 and LC-117 Skytrains, LP-2J Neptunes, C-121 Constellations to the ski-equipped LC-130 Hercules. And helos such as the HO-4S Chickasaw, LH-34 Seahorse and HH-1N Ice Huey. VXE-6 was disbanded in 1999, and aerial support for the USAP is now the responsibility of the Air Force Reserve.
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  47. What was the codename of the Navy\'s Antarctic research project from 1954 to 1968, and assistance to the US Antarctic Program (USAP) of the National Science Foundation until 1994?
    OPERATION DEEP FREEZE
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  48. Where is the campus of the US Naval Academy?
    Annapolis, MD.
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  49. Admiral Fletcher commanded what carrier groups in the Battle of Guadalcanal?
    The Saratoga, Wasp and the Enterprise.
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  50. What ship were the Sullivan brothers (5 brothers) assigned to and all 5 perished aboard?
    The Juneau.
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  51. Who was the only Naval MOH recipient of the Guadalcanal Campaign?
    Scott Norman (posthumous-after death)
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  52. What famous naval station has mooring areas called "Battleship Row" and "Tin Can Row"?
    Naval Station Pearl Harbor, HI. Only "Tin Can Row" is used to moor active ships. "Battleship Row" is the final resting place for the USS Arizona and location of the WWII memorial.
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  53. What former US naval facility's motto was "Birthplace of the Winds?"
    Naval Station and Naval Air Station Adak, AK
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  54. What US naval facility's motto is "The Footprint of Freedom"?
    US Naval Facility Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory
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  55. Where do all officer and enlisted SEAL candidates attend Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S) training?
    Naval Amphibious Base Coronado, San Diego, CA
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  56. What naval air station was granted official recognition as the "Birthplace of Naval Aviation" by a House Armed Services Committee resolution?
    NAS North Island, San Diego, CA
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  57. What are "black shoes?"
    Officers and enlisteds in the surface and submarine communities are referred to as "black shoes," to separate them from "brown shoes" -- those in the aviation community.
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  58. Where does "Anchors Aweigh" derive from?
    The word "weigh" in this sense comes from the archaic word meaning to heave, hoist or raise. "Aweigh" means that that action has been completed. The anchor is aweigh when it is pulled from the bottom. This event is duly noted in the ship's log. In 1906, Lieut. Zimmerman was approached by Midshipman First Class Alfred Hart Miles with a request for a new march. As a member of the Class of 1907, Miles and his classmates "were eager to have a piece of music that would be inspiring, one with a swing to it so it could be used as a football marching song, and one that would live forever." Zimmermann composed the tune and Miles set the title and wrote to two first stanzas in November 1906. This march was played by the band and sung by the brigade at the 1906 Army-Navy football game later that month, and for the first time in several seasons, Navy won. This march, Anchors Aweigh, was subsequently dedicated to the Academy Class of 1907 and adopted as the official song of the U.S. Navy. The concluding stanza was written by Midshipman Royal Lovell, Class of 1926.
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Vietnam
  1. What was the name of the most successful unofficial American Soldiers Newspaper in the Vietnam War?
    The Grunt Free Press.
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  2. What was the most highly successful secret program at eliminating the Viet Cong organizational \'Infra Structure?
    The Phoenix Program Employed Provisional Reconnaisance Units (PRU) under the control of Spec Ops personnel and was so successful Hanoi mounted a counter smear propaganda campaign calling them assasins which was totally false!
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  3. Which Gunship support Units accrued the highest amount of per capita medals and citations?
    The US Navy \'Seawolves\' using old UH-1Bs were part of Naval warfare Spec Ops supporting the SEALs and PBRs..flying in all weather,day or night even under heavy fire accrued the most..they were everybody\'s First Choice!
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  4. What is the basis for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall?
    The CDAC - the Combat Area Casualty File
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  5. How many men killed in Vietnam were 16?
    5
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  6. How old was the oldest man killed in Vietnam?
    62
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  7. What was Ho Chi Minhs birth name?
    Nguyen Tat Thanh.
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  8. How many Medals of honor were awarded for valor to date for the Vietnam War?
    245
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  9. There were three catagories of Red Cross Workers in Vietnam, one of them were the Supplement Recreational Activities Overseas (SRAO). What was the nickname given to this group of women?
    Donut Dollies.
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  10. Master Sgt. Debra J Dulinsky of the US Marine Corps was known for what in the Vietnam War?
    She was the first woman to be ordered into a combat zone.
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  11. What was the name of the operation to evacuate the American Embassy in Saigon on april 29, 1975?
    Operation Frequent Wind.
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  12. What was the name of the operation to evacuate the American Embassy in Phnom Penh, in Cambodia on April 12, 1975?
    Operation Eagle Pull
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  13. What was OPERATION MARKET TIME?
    OPERATION MARKET TIME was a joint effort of the US Navy, US Coast Guard and Republic of Vietnam Navy to blockade the ememy's use of sea trading routes for resupply. The operation was under the control of Task Force 115.
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  14. What was OPERATION GAME WARDEN?
    OPERATION GAME WARDEN was the Naval Riverine Force's mission to prevent enemy use of South Vietnam's river highways for resupply. The operation was under the control of Task Force 116.
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  15. Besides the US, what other allied nations were involved in the conflict?
    Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the Republic of South Korea, and the Republic of the Phillippines.
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  16. What foreign military unit was awarded the US Presidential Unit Citation (PUC)?
    President Lyndon B. Johnson awarded the Presidential Unit Citation to members of D Company, 6th Battalion Royal Australian Regiment (6RAR). The citation was awarded to the Aussies for its 'extraordinary heroism while engaged in military operations against an opposing armed force' during the Battle of Long Tan on August 18, 1966.
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  17. In 1968 who convinced President Johnson to deny General William Westmoreland's request for 206,000 more troops in Vietnam?
    Lyndon Johnson's newly appointed Secretary of Defense, Clark Clifford
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  18. During the Vietnam War,which Airborne Unit did a group Combat Jump,qualifying all participants for a set of the coveted Combat Jump Wings?
    The 173rd Airborne
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World War I
  1. What stretcher bearer, known to the Diggers of Gallipoli as, "The Bloke with the Donk", repeatedly exposed himself to intense enemy fire to haul wounded ANZAC soldiers to safety using a captured donkey?
    John Simpson Kirkpatrick
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  2. Who were the original Stosstruppen or 'Storm Troopers' of the World War I?
    Specially Trained Battalions of German Army attack troops. The title was later taken by the Nazi Party.
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  3. On Sept. 28, 1918, during the Battle of Marcoing, Hitler's life was spared when a British Private, later awarded the Victoria Cross for conspicuous gallantry, took pity on the wounded Lance Corporal, & chose not to shoot him. Who was that soldier?
    Henry Tandey
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  4. The "VECHEKA" (or "CHEKA"), the secret assassination/espionage bureau of what nation, was created 19 Dec 1917?
    USSR
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  5. What German general described the 8th Aug 1918 Canadian/Australian/British offensive as "the Black Day of the German Army"?
    General Erich Ludendorff
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  6. What infamous German Corperal received the Iron Cross 2nd and 1st Class before being hospitalized for mustard gas exposure?
    Adolf Hitler
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  7. What was an early name for American Soldiers in World War I?
    Sammy
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  8. What's the nickname for Australian soldiers?
    "Digger". There are three theories about where the term Digger came from. Any one may be correct. Any one may be wrong. 1.) Those who enlisted from Western Australia (and other Australian states) were gold miners or tin miners. They were 'diggers' and the name traveled with them to Gallipoli. 2.) On Gallipoli if you wanted to live you dug a hole. Many holes joined with other holes to become trenches. Trenches needed to be constantly re-dug. So the blokes who survived were 'the diggers'. 3.) In his book "The Maori Battalion in the First World War" the respected historian Chris Pugsley claims "the New Zealand Pioneers work in building the communications trenches...would earn them the sobriquet the "diggers". The British units they served coined the term on account of the Pioneers exploits as the "Digging Battalion". "Digger" was adopted by the rest of the New Zealand Division in 1916. By 1917 the name has spread from the New Zealand Division to the Australian Division in the the ANZAC Corps.
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  9. What were grenadiers in WWI?
    Men tasked with the bombing of trenches and positions using grenades of various types.
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  10. A British bombing team (grenadiers) usually consisted of what in WWI?
    The British bombing team usually consisted of nine men at a time: an NCO, two throwers, two carriers, two bayonet-men to defend the team and two 'spare' men for use when casualties were incurred.
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  11. Where does the name doughboys come from?
    'Doughboys' was the nickname given to the American Expeditionary Force that took part in the later years of World War One. The actual origin of the term 'Doughboy' is still debated within both US historical and military circles, but it dates back to at least the American-Mexican War of 1846-47.
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World War II
  1. What World War II US Navy admiral said: "Hit hard, hit first, hit often."?
    Admiral William F. Halsey Jr.
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  2. Who was the US General killed by his own Bombers in Normandy in July 1944?
    Lieutenant-General Leslie J McNair
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  3. Who was General Eisenhower's Chief of Staff for the 1944 Normandy Invasion?
    General Walter Bedell Smith
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  4. Of what material was the Luftwaffe aviator's jacket made?
    Leather
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  5. A white eagle descending on a blood-red outline of Corregidor island, became the insignia of what heroic World War II US Army airborne regiment?
    503rd Parachute Infantry
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  6. From what island in the Marianas were US aircraft launched to carry out the A-bomb attacks on Japan?
    Tinian
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  7. What field marshal surrendered the German forces at Stalingrad?
    Feldmarschall Frederich Von Paulus
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  8. What popular American movie star's name was given to the inflatable life vest used in World War II?
    "Mae-West"
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  9. What Cruiser met a similar fate as the Indianapolis ?
    The Cruiser Juneau was caught in the middle of a huge firefight between US and Japanese Naval Forces and was sunk by fire from both sides,due to battle conditions no ships came to rescue survivors and no post-battle SAR was ordered,days later a horrified search plane spotted the few remaining survivers but it was too late for the Five Sullivans,the eldest had been eaten by sharks after calling for the others for days in vain.
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  10. Which Armed Forces Branch sustained the highest per capita casualty rate in WWII?
    The US Coast Guard did with a 95% Casualty Rate.
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  11. What specific injury was the cause of General George Patton's death just after WWII?
    A broken neck from severe whiplash in a traffic accident in Germany.
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  12. What were "Mulberries" in World War II?
    Artificial harbors built by the British and towed to Normandy.
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  13. What did the War Department General Orders Number 24, 4 March 1947 provide?
    Time and geographic criteria for World War II campaigns - timeline.
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  14. The Woman Marines Continuous Active Service began when in World War II?
    In Feb, 1943
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  15. Who was the first enlisted Marine to recieve the MOH in World War II?
    Sgt. Clyde Thomasen, Makin Island Raid Aug 17, 1942.
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  16. What is the name of the person that introduced the idea of using the Navajo Code talkers in World War II?
    Philip Johnston
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  17. Who commanded the northern Task Force in Operation "Flintlock" in World War II?
    Rear Admiral Richard L. Connolly.
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  18. Who commanded the southern Task Force in Operation "Flintlock" in World War II?
    Rear Admiral Richmond Kelly Turner.
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  19. What was Admiral Richard L. Connolly's nickname?
    Close-in.
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  20. Who was the first officer in the US Marine Corps to recieve the MOH in World War II?
    1st. Lieutenant George Cannon, Midway Island Dec 7, 1941
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  21. What changed the tide of the war with the Japanese?
    When the Air Field at Guadalcanal became useable the Japanese lost control of the air.
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  22. What was Stalin's original name?
    Stalin's original name was Josif Djugashvili.
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  23. What Japanese battleship was a suicide battleship on it's way to attack?
    The Yamato
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  24. When did the Nazi salute become standard and why was it this date?
    After July 1944, after the attempt on Hitler's life was it adopted as a standard salute.
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  25. What was the name of the bomber that bombed Nagasaki?
    Bock's Car
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  26. What was the Atlantic Wall?
    The Atlantic Wall was an extensive system of coastal fortifications; built by the German Third Reich, during the Second World War, in order to defend against invasion by the Allies. The defensive wall was never completed; consisting primarily of batteries, bunkers, and minefields, which during 1942-1944 stretched from the French-Spanish border into Norway.
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  27. During World War II, why were the Germans called kraut?
    The term most likely can be traced to the German table food called Sauerkraut which includes salted, shredded cabbage. • Kraut – a slang term for Germans applied by Allied soldiers.
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  28. During WW2, why did the USMC switch to the P-44 utilities instead of keeping the perfectly good P-41s? And what is that rediculous horizontal pocket across the butt for?
    P41 USMC Utilities In November 1941, the U.S. Marine Corps introduced the sage green HBT (HerringBone Twill) utilities as a fatigue uniform to be worn on work and training duties. However, the Marines immediately took to wearing the comfortable and hard-wearing clothing as their main combat uniform. The early Pacific battles were fought wearing a mix of khakis, Army HBT uniforms and USMC utilities. By 1943, the USMC utilities were the signature uniform of the U.S. Marines. In late 1944, and fatigue cap was designed and the pattern of the utilities was modified, creating the P44 uniform. By summer 1945, both patterns were being worn concurrently.
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General Military
  1. What is the "Senior Service" of the US armed forces?
    Army
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  2. What was Executive Order 9066?
    An order for moving 'enemy aliens' (principally Japanese Americans) away from coastal areas in the USA.
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  3. Who was NATO's first Supreme Allied Commander, Europe?
    General Dwight D. Eisenhower.
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  4. The "Mannerheim Cross" was, until a few years ago, the highest award for valour of what Scandinavian country?
    Finland
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  5. What NATO nation is the only country in the world whose air force is larger than its army?
    Canada
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  6. Where is Britain's main officer academy located?
    Sandhurst
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  7. The 1st Canadian Parachute Bn. of World War II is the forerunner of what present Canadian regiment?
    Canadian Airborne Regt.
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  8. With what US military corps does the British Royal Welch Fusiliers (23rd of Foot) maintain musical affiliations?
    US Marine Corps
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  9. "Pro Patria" ("For Country") is the motto of what Canadian infantry regiment?
    Royal Canadian Regt.
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  10. What Mongol war leader amused himself by building pyramids of human heads?
    Tamerlane
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  11. Later in the year of what war, on 21 October 1967, was the Israeli destroyer "Eilat" sunk by Egyptian missile boats?
    Six Day War
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  12. What is the color of the ribbon for the "Hero of the Soviet Union" medal?
    Red
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  13. What action, taken by the 1st Parachute Regt. (1 REP) of the French Foreign Legion, 22 Apr 1960, caused it to be disbanded in disgrace?
    Mutiny
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  14. Who did Queen Elizabeth I appoint to replace the Earl of Essex in his attempt to subdue the Irish?
    Charles Blount
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  15. Despite earlier experiences and after elaborate preparation, US forces assaulted what Aleutian island only to discover that the Japanese had pulled out weeks before?
    Kiska
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  16. In 1834-1841, US Army, Navy and Marine units fought a bitter war with what Floridian Indian tribes?
    Seminoles
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  17. What was the fabulous broadsword carried by legendary King Arthur?
    "Excalibur"
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  18. Which British regiments practice the custom of the "eating of the leek"?
    Welsh
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  19. What high ranking North Vietnamese was a graduate of the Soviet General Staff Academy?
    General Vo Nguyen Giap
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  20. In July 1937, Japanese and Chinese troops clashed at the Marco Polo Bridge, outside what Chinese city?
    Peking
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  21. What Japanese city suffered the worst firebombing in history, 10 May 1945?
    Tokyo
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  22. What inept Mexican general of the US-Mexican War lost a leg while fighting the French in 1838?
    General Antonia Lopez de Santa Anna
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  23. What did the Rhodesian Army troops call the communist FRELIMO insurgents of Mozambique?
    "Freddies"
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  24. What 1944 French battle was the last time that defense of a medieval fortress played a decisive role against a mechanized army?
    Metz
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  25. which branch of the US Armed Forces is the longest continuous serving branch?
    The United States Coast Guard,since August 4,1790 the US Coast Guard has always had an active ongoing role as a law enforcement agency as well as SAR,whether in peacetime or war.
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  26. On March 21,1791 the first Military Seagoing Officers were commissioned by President George Washington. What Branch of Service were they assigned to?
    The US Revenue Cutter Service,now known as the US Coast Guard.
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  27. Who was the first woman to receive two medals and what were they?
    Cordelia L. Cook, US Army Nurse Corp. The Bronze Star and the Purple Heart.
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  28. Who was the first woman to receive the MOH?
    Dr. Mary E. Walker. A contract surgeon in the Civil War.
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  29. Who was the first woman to receive a Purple Heart?
    Annie G. Fox while serving at Hickam Field during the attack on Pear Harbor.
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  30. Who cleans up property formerly owned, leased, possessed or operated by the DOD. Such as formerly used defense sites?
    The Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) manages and executes the program of clean up.
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  31. What is the largest US regional command?
    The US Pacific Command (PACOM) is the largest of the US combined service commands. Headquartered at Camp H.M. Smith in Honolulu, HI, PACOM\'s area of responsibility covers: - More than 50 percent of the earth\'s surface; approximately 105 million square miles (nearly 169 million square kilometers). From the west coast of the United States mainland to the east coast of Africa (excluding the waters north of 5° S and west of 68° E); from the Arctic to Antarctic; including the state of Hawaii and forces in Alaska. Traverses 16 time zones. - Nearly 60 percent of the world\'s population. - 43 countries, 20 foreign territories and possessions, and 10 US territories. - The world\'s six largest armed forces: (1) Peoples Republic of China, (2) United States, (3) Russia, (4) India, (5) North Korea, (6) South Korea. The US Pacific Command\'s mission is to enhance security and promotes peaceful development in the Asia-Pacific region by deterring aggression, responding to crises and fighting to win.
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  32. What was the name of the first station on Antarctica established by the US Navy in 1957?
    McMurdo Station. In December 1955, Hut Point was selected by a naval task force as a US site for Operation Deep Freeze I, to support the polar science activities on the 1957 International Geophysical. Ten ten-man and 30 two-man tents formed a temporary camp until prefabricated buildings could be unloaded and erected by Seabees. The site was first called Naval Air Facility McMurdo. The first winter over at McMurdo was in 1956 and consisted of 93 men. The facility was renamed McMurdo Station in 1961. McMurdo Station resembles an urban center in its population diversity and hectic pace. McMurdo serves as an international center where scientists and support personnel meet and exchange ideas.
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  33. What US military service has never directly posted any of its personnel on Antarctica?
    The Marine Corps never established a presence or provided support to the US Antarctic Program (USAP). Military airlift and logistic support for the National Science Foundation research teams has come from the Navy, Army, Air Force and Coast Guard. Only one Marine, co-pilot Capt. Rayburn A. Hudman, was killed in October 1956 along with the Navy crew of his P2V-2N Neptune when it crashed during whiteout conditions at McMurdo Station.
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  34. What was the Air Field at Guadalcanal named?
    Henderson Air Field in Honor of Major Lofton R. Henderson killed in the Battle of Midway.
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  35. How many Military Fighting Forces are there?
    Five
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  36. The term "made his bird" means what?
    A Marine rotated home
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  37. What was chewed by the Vietnamese that turned their teeth black?
    betel nut (Beetle Nut)
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  38. What does E-Tool mean?
    Excavating tool. A small folding shovel used mainly for digging fighting holes. The best ones had a solid wooden handle and the shovel blade could be fixed at a right angle to the handle, with a "pick" sticking out the other way to break up hard packed dirt.
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  39. What is a green-eye?
    Slang for a night vision device that magnified available light 10,000 times.
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  40. What is a Mike-Mike?
    slang. Radio code for "millimeter." A radio operator might call CACO to report his CAP was "... taking incoming 60 mike-mike mortar fire."
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  41. What's an MPC?
    Military Payment Certificates or "funny money."
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  42. What's a P-38?
    slang. A tiny can opener provided with C-rations.
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  43. Former soldiers and airmen who have received the Medal of Honor are entitled to an annual pension of how much upon reaching the age of 65?
    $120
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  44. Five men have received two Medals of Honor. In 1918 the regulations were changed to prevent what?
    To prevent any one person getting it more than once.
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  45. What's a PF?
    Popular Forces, militia soldiers of the Republic of South Vietnam, usually without uniforms, armed with a hodgepodge of old weapons, they had even less training and support than the RFs.
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  46. What military agency oversees the procurement and distribution of nearly everything that warfighters need?
    The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia (DSCP) supplies and manages over $7.66 billion worth of food, clothing and textiles, pharmaceuticals, medical supplies, general and industrial items in support of America\'s warfighters worldwide and their eligible dependents. Other customers include America\'s school children participating in federal school lunch programs, the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA), the Bureau of Prisons, US Forest Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Veterans Administration and other non-Defense Department customers. DSCP can trace its roots back to 1800 with the construction of the Schuylkill Arsenal in Philadelphia -- originally a warehouse for ammunition and other military supplies. Local seamstresses were contracted to make uniforms by hand in their own homes. Today, DSCP has a global reach -- the Defense Supply Center Philadelphia-European Region is the warfighters' supplier of choice in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East; with 13 offices in six cou! ntries. The Defense Supply Center Philadelphia-Pacific Region operates in 12 locations and 11 time zones. Support offices in Alaska, Japan, Okinawa, Korea, Guam and Hawaii provide rapid and flexible solutions to logistical challenges within the area. DSCP has a long and heralded tradition of providing supplies and services, when and where needed -- around the clock, around the world.
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  47. Where is the prison for US military personnel sentenced by courts-martial to confinement for one year or more?
    The US Disciplinary Barracks (USDB) at the US Army Combined Arms Center, Ft. Leavenworth, KS. The USDB was established by Congress in 1874 and has been in operation at Ft. Leavenworth since May 1875. This military prison has the distinction of offering the first vocational training program established in this country for prisoners. The USDB is the only long-term prison in the Department of Defense, incarcerating personnel from all branches of the service. The last hanging execution at the USDB was Pvt. John A. Bennett in April 1961. A new 521-bed USDB facility was completed in 2002 and is considerably smaller than the original one, which at one time housed more than 1000 inmates.
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  48. General Douglas MacArther should have been fired LONG before President Harry truman did the job,why?
    ;In 1932 President Herbert Hoover ordered the Army Chief of Staff to provide assistance to the DC Police Chiefin dealing with the Bonus Marchers and to mobilize only if the Police Chief requested it. Believing he knew better than the Police Chief what needed to be done,he violated the President\'s orders and ordered an attack without ever being requested for help by the Police Chief. President Hoover sadly lacked the guts to fire him on the spot as he should have!
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  49. What three Famous WWII US Army Generals were involved in a shameful act against fellow Veterans in 1932?
    Dwight D. Eisenhower and George S. Patton acting upon General Douglas MacArther's ill cocieved orders attacked and fired upon Veterans demanding an early payment of their bonus certificates in 1932 due to the depression, that were not payable til 1945. Several were killed.
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  50. Which Armed Forces Branch is the Cradle of Aviation?
    The US Coast Guard. The location of Orville and Wilber Wright's first flight at Kitty Hawk,NC was a US Lifesaving Station origonally part of the Revenue Cutter service and re-amalgamated in 1915.The Coast Guard's ANCIENT ORDER OF THE PTERODACTYL Club's motto is,"Flying since the world was flat" .
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  51. What is the motto od US Special Forces ?
    De Oppresso Libre ( to liberate the oppressed)
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  52. What is the motto of the SAS ?
    Who Dares,Wins!
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  53. Which NATO country's Spec Ops unit has a higher attrition rate than than the SEAL training phase BUDS at Coronado,Ca.?
    The British SAS 'selection' phase averages a higher attrition rate.
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  54. What unit was Delta Force a carbon copy of when it was formed?
    The British SAS,Special Air Service,and it's Australian counterparte is possible the finest such unit in the world today.
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  55. What are the animal mascots of each of the five Armed Forces of the US?
    Army-Mule , Navy-Goat , Marines-Bulldog , Air Force-Falcon , Coast Guard-Bear
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  56. What is Chickenhawk?
    By definition, the term chickenhawk is used in a political sense to refer to a politician who is strongly pro-military intervention but has not himself served in the military. It is said to have been used in this sense as early as 1988 but its first appearance in the media appears to have been by the syndicated journalist Richard Roeper in a Chicago Sun-Times article of November 15, 2000, in which he criticized what he called George W. Bush's "chickenhawk stance on the Vietnam War." However, the term appears to have been used before then by opponents of Dick Cheney during campaigning in the bitterly contested 2000 Presidential election, in which he strongly criticized the Clinton Administration's handling of military affairs. Previously, the term "war wimp" was sometimes used instead, most notably by former Congressman Andrew Jacobs (D-Indiana) who often characterized overzealous supporters of the Cold War as such if they had not served in either the Korean War or the Vietnam War (one politician so labelled was Dan Quayle). Its use was intended to highlight the fact that many of those who were most strongly interventionist (or just militarist, in the eyes of some) had not themselves undergone combat duty or at least military service despite being eligible by age to have done so. Here, "chicken" denotes cowardice, while "hawk" had long been used to refer to politicians who favor an aggressive foreign policy (as in "hawkish"). More specifically, many of those labelled are Baby Boomers who did not serve in the Vietnam War. This usage was reinforced during and after the post-9/11 wars in Afghanistan and (especially) Iraq, in which many of the most prominent supporters of both wars had had no history of military service. The users of the term are predominantly political radicals, mostly left-wing, but also including some paleoconservative (signs reading "Pluck The Chickenhawks" have been observed at anti-war rallies held since the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq began). The epithet is also sometimes hurled by Baby Busters, or, more broadly, members of Generation X, who perceive inherent hypocrisy in Baby Boomers leading a nation into war after having promoted pacifism in their younger days. On April 28, 2004, Senator Frank Lautenberg (D-New Jersey) used the term in an attack on Vice President Dick Cheney on the floor of the US Senate.
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  57. What agency is responsible for issuing pay to servicemembers on the 1st and 15th of each month?
    The Defense Finanace and Accounting Service (DFAS) is the military's "one-stop" paymaster for all uniformed branches, Department of Defense civilian employees and military retirees. In 1991, the Secretary of Defense created DFAS to unify the fianance operations of each service branch and reduce the cost of Defense Department finance and accounting operations.
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  58. What is DEERS?
    DEERS is the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System, a computerized database of military servicemembers, families and others worldwide who are entitled to medical, commissary and exchange benefits. Active-duty and retired service members are automatically registered in DEERS, but they must register their family members and ensure they're correctly entered into the database.
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  59. Where do Cadences come from?
    Pvt. Willie Duckworth, a black soldier on detached service with Fort Slocum's Provisional Training Center, sang out the first-ever rendition of "Sound-off," "Sound-off; 1-2; Sound-off; 3-4; Count cadence; 1-2-3-4; 1-2 -- 3-4." Other soldiers in the formation joined in and their dragging feet picked up momentum. At a time when black soldiers' achievements were just being acknowledged by many in the Army, the "Duckworth Chant," as Duckworth's cadence came to be called, got notice. Col. Bernard Lentz, Fort Slocum's commander, recognized it as a way to keep his soldiers in step while boosting unit pride and camaraderie. Duckworth's Chant built on a musical tradition that began just after the Revolutionary War. Back then, American marching troops took special pleasure in singing "Yankee Doodle" -- the song the British had used to taunt them -- back to the defeated Redcoats. Through the years, other military marching songs arose. During the Civil War, "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" and "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again" sent blood pumping through Yankee and Rebel veins. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, "Over There" and "The Caisson Song" were popular among marching troops. The official Army song, "The Army Goes Rolling Along," even urges soldiers to "count off the cadence loud and strong." But Duckworth changed the whole way the Army looked -- and continues to look -- at cadence calls. Soon soldiers were making up their own cadences, personalizing them to include ditties about their own units and soldiers.
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  60. What is the US military pace for marching or running?
    Marching is done at 120 steps per minute. Running is 180 steps per minute.
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  61. Why do you sing cadence?
    There are a few reasons. When the entire unit is bopping to the same "sheet" of music, everyone stays in step. That looks good, and you don't have people tripping over someone else's feet. Breathing is another reason. If you are forced to exhale by singing, you will also be forced to inhale when you are not singing. Motivation is the third reason. Calls that are humorous or have a plot can make soldiers stop thinking about the cold and rain, or how much their feet hurt.
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  62. Why are some cadence calls Jodies?
    Nobody really knows. A recurring character in cadence calls is a person named Jodie. Jodie is known as the man or woman who is having fun at home while you are sweating in the field.
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  63. Who was GySgt. Hartman?
    Gunnery Sergeant Hartman was the fictional U.S. Marine Corps Drill Instructor character played by R. Lee Ermey in the 1987 Stanley Kubrick film, FULL METAL JACKET.
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  64. Why do the stars appear on the right hand corner of the flag on the patches of some US soldiers' uniforms?
    According to current uniform regulations from all branches, US flag patches worn on combat uniform sleeves must have the union (the blue 50-star field) facing toward the FRONT of the wearer; which is how the Stars & Stripes normally flies when seen from a vehicle or vessel, and not stripe field first.
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Day 5 of week 47 day 327
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